Bioremediation of biodiesel and biohydraulic oils by food waste composting

K. A. Malinska, E. D. White, Joseph Manuel Sr Perez, A. C. Srebro, Thomas Lehman Richard

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Bio-based hydraulic oils and biodiesel fuels are increasingly used on farms, in business and industry. While petrochemical spills and disposal of similar fluids create hazardous waste concerns, these bio-based products are generally considered more environmentally friendly. This study investigated the biodegradation of these compounds in composting systems, both directly as a disposal method for used oils or fuels, and blended with contaminated soils to simulate clean-up of leaks and spills. Two studies are reported here. The first, a bench-scale composting trial of compost + 20% soil (wet basis, w.b.), included three fuel contamination treatments, each applied at 30% of the soil fraction: 100% biodiesel (B100), 100% petroleum diesel (D2), or a blend of 20% biodiesel with 80% petroleum diesel (B20), with all three treatments having a final contaminant concentration of 6% in the compost and soil mixture. The second study was a lab-scale composting trial of compost + 10% (w.b.) either new or used bio-based hydraulic fluid vs. mineral hydraulic fluid. Results demonstrated that the bio-based products degraded much more rapidly than conventional petrochemical fluids, with about 86% of the recovered content of bio-based hydraulic fluid degrading within three weeks, versus only 34% of the conventional oil. Similarly, about 90% of B100 degraded after three weeks, while approximately 75% of the B20 blend degraded. Composting appears to have considerable potential for bioremediation and disposal of these bio-based products in agricultural and industrial settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
EventInternational Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture - Broomfield, CO, United States
Duration: Sep 16 2007Sep 19 2007

Other

OtherInternational Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture
CountryUnited States
CityBroomfield, CO
Period9/16/079/19/07

Fingerprint

food waste
Composting
Bioremediation
bioremediation
biodiesel
Biodiesel
composting
Hydraulic fluids
biobased products
Soils
fluid mechanics
oils
food
fluid
oil
compost
composts
Hazardous materials spills
hydraulics
petrochemicals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

Malinska, K. A., White, E. D., Perez, J. M. S., Srebro, A. C., & Richard, T. L. (2007). Bioremediation of biodiesel and biohydraulic oils by food waste composting. Paper presented at International Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture, Broomfield, CO, United States.
Malinska, K. A. ; White, E. D. ; Perez, Joseph Manuel Sr ; Srebro, A. C. ; Richard, Thomas Lehman. / Bioremediation of biodiesel and biohydraulic oils by food waste composting. Paper presented at International Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture, Broomfield, CO, United States.
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abstract = "Bio-based hydraulic oils and biodiesel fuels are increasingly used on farms, in business and industry. While petrochemical spills and disposal of similar fluids create hazardous waste concerns, these bio-based products are generally considered more environmentally friendly. This study investigated the biodegradation of these compounds in composting systems, both directly as a disposal method for used oils or fuels, and blended with contaminated soils to simulate clean-up of leaks and spills. Two studies are reported here. The first, a bench-scale composting trial of compost + 20{\%} soil (wet basis, w.b.), included three fuel contamination treatments, each applied at 30{\%} of the soil fraction: 100{\%} biodiesel (B100), 100{\%} petroleum diesel (D2), or a blend of 20{\%} biodiesel with 80{\%} petroleum diesel (B20), with all three treatments having a final contaminant concentration of 6{\%} in the compost and soil mixture. The second study was a lab-scale composting trial of compost + 10{\%} (w.b.) either new or used bio-based hydraulic fluid vs. mineral hydraulic fluid. Results demonstrated that the bio-based products degraded much more rapidly than conventional petrochemical fluids, with about 86{\%} of the recovered content of bio-based hydraulic fluid degrading within three weeks, versus only 34{\%} of the conventional oil. Similarly, about 90{\%} of B100 degraded after three weeks, while approximately 75{\%} of the B20 blend degraded. Composting appears to have considerable potential for bioremediation and disposal of these bio-based products in agricultural and industrial settings.",
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Malinska, KA, White, ED, Perez, JMS, Srebro, AC & Richard, TL 2007, 'Bioremediation of biodiesel and biohydraulic oils by food waste composting', Paper presented at International Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture, Broomfield, CO, United States, 9/16/07 - 9/19/07.

Bioremediation of biodiesel and biohydraulic oils by food waste composting. / Malinska, K. A.; White, E. D.; Perez, Joseph Manuel Sr; Srebro, A. C.; Richard, Thomas Lehman.

2007. Paper presented at International Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture, Broomfield, CO, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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T1 - Bioremediation of biodiesel and biohydraulic oils by food waste composting

AU - Malinska, K. A.

AU - White, E. D.

AU - Perez, Joseph Manuel Sr

AU - Srebro, A. C.

AU - Richard, Thomas Lehman

PY - 2007/12/1

Y1 - 2007/12/1

N2 - Bio-based hydraulic oils and biodiesel fuels are increasingly used on farms, in business and industry. While petrochemical spills and disposal of similar fluids create hazardous waste concerns, these bio-based products are generally considered more environmentally friendly. This study investigated the biodegradation of these compounds in composting systems, both directly as a disposal method for used oils or fuels, and blended with contaminated soils to simulate clean-up of leaks and spills. Two studies are reported here. The first, a bench-scale composting trial of compost + 20% soil (wet basis, w.b.), included three fuel contamination treatments, each applied at 30% of the soil fraction: 100% biodiesel (B100), 100% petroleum diesel (D2), or a blend of 20% biodiesel with 80% petroleum diesel (B20), with all three treatments having a final contaminant concentration of 6% in the compost and soil mixture. The second study was a lab-scale composting trial of compost + 10% (w.b.) either new or used bio-based hydraulic fluid vs. mineral hydraulic fluid. Results demonstrated that the bio-based products degraded much more rapidly than conventional petrochemical fluids, with about 86% of the recovered content of bio-based hydraulic fluid degrading within three weeks, versus only 34% of the conventional oil. Similarly, about 90% of B100 degraded after three weeks, while approximately 75% of the B20 blend degraded. Composting appears to have considerable potential for bioremediation and disposal of these bio-based products in agricultural and industrial settings.

AB - Bio-based hydraulic oils and biodiesel fuels are increasingly used on farms, in business and industry. While petrochemical spills and disposal of similar fluids create hazardous waste concerns, these bio-based products are generally considered more environmentally friendly. This study investigated the biodegradation of these compounds in composting systems, both directly as a disposal method for used oils or fuels, and blended with contaminated soils to simulate clean-up of leaks and spills. Two studies are reported here. The first, a bench-scale composting trial of compost + 20% soil (wet basis, w.b.), included three fuel contamination treatments, each applied at 30% of the soil fraction: 100% biodiesel (B100), 100% petroleum diesel (D2), or a blend of 20% biodiesel with 80% petroleum diesel (B20), with all three treatments having a final contaminant concentration of 6% in the compost and soil mixture. The second study was a lab-scale composting trial of compost + 10% (w.b.) either new or used bio-based hydraulic fluid vs. mineral hydraulic fluid. Results demonstrated that the bio-based products degraded much more rapidly than conventional petrochemical fluids, with about 86% of the recovered content of bio-based hydraulic fluid degrading within three weeks, versus only 34% of the conventional oil. Similarly, about 90% of B100 degraded after three weeks, while approximately 75% of the B20 blend degraded. Composting appears to have considerable potential for bioremediation and disposal of these bio-based products in agricultural and industrial settings.

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Malinska KA, White ED, Perez JMS, Srebro AC, Richard TL. Bioremediation of biodiesel and biohydraulic oils by food waste composting. 2007. Paper presented at International Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture, Broomfield, CO, United States.