Black males in IT higher education in the USA: The digital divide in the academic pipeline re-visited

Curtis C. Cain, Eileen M. Trauth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Results of a field study of the influences on Black male undergraduate students' participation in IT fields at a Predominately White Institution and Historically Black College and University are presented. This analysis shows how inadequacies within the academic pipeline present themselves as barriers to success for Black students. The findings are evidence that despite barriers Black students are not giving up on the Information Technology discipline despite the low number of Black professors at PWIs and HBCUs. The digital divide is once again shifting from usage to empowerment. Stereotype threat is threatening Black identity as Black males try to adapt to a field in which they are vastly underrepresented. A logical next step for researchers is to identify ways in which Black students are being affected by these inequalities. These findings indicate that Black students are disadvantaged in IT fields and steps must be taken to ensure they do not remain victims of a leaky academic pipeline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012
Pages1560-1567
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Event18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Aug 9 2012Aug 12 2012

Publication series

Name18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012
Volume2

Other

Other18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period8/9/128/12/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

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