Blood pressure regulation III: What happens when one system must serve two masters: Temperature and pressure regulation?

William Lawrence Kenney, Jr., Anna E. Stanhewicz, Rebecca S. Bruning, Lacy Marie Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When prolonged intense exercise is performed at high ambient temperatures, cardiac output must meet dual demands for increased blood flow to contracting muscle and to the skin. The literature has commonly painted this scenario as a fierce competition, wherein one circulation preserves perfusion at the expense of the other, with the regulated maintenance of blood pressure as the ultimate goal. This review redefines this scenario as commensalism, an integrated balance of regulatory control where one circulation benefits with little functional effect on the other. In young, healthy subjects, arterial pressure rarely falls to any great extent during either extreme passive heating or prolonged dynamic exercise in the heat, nor does body temperature rise disproportionately due to a compromised skin blood flow. Rather, it often takes the superimposition of additional stressors - e.g., dehydration or simulated hemorrhage - upon heat stress to substantially impact blood pressure regulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-479
Number of pages13
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

Fingerprint

Hot Temperature
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Pressure
Skin
Temperature
Symbiosis
Body Temperature
Dehydration
Cardiac Output
Heating
Healthy Volunteers
Arterial Pressure
Perfusion
Maintenance
Hemorrhage
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Blood pressure regulation III: What happens when one system must serve two masters: Temperature and pressure regulation?",
abstract = "When prolonged intense exercise is performed at high ambient temperatures, cardiac output must meet dual demands for increased blood flow to contracting muscle and to the skin. The literature has commonly painted this scenario as a fierce competition, wherein one circulation preserves perfusion at the expense of the other, with the regulated maintenance of blood pressure as the ultimate goal. This review redefines this scenario as commensalism, an integrated balance of regulatory control where one circulation benefits with little functional effect on the other. In young, healthy subjects, arterial pressure rarely falls to any great extent during either extreme passive heating or prolonged dynamic exercise in the heat, nor does body temperature rise disproportionately due to a compromised skin blood flow. Rather, it often takes the superimposition of additional stressors - e.g., dehydration or simulated hemorrhage - upon heat stress to substantially impact blood pressure regulation.",
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Blood pressure regulation III : What happens when one system must serve two masters: Temperature and pressure regulation? / Kenney, Jr., William Lawrence; Stanhewicz, Anna E.; Bruning, Rebecca S.; Alexander, Lacy Marie.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 114, No. 3, 01.03.2014, p. 467-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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