Bloodflow velocimetry using wideband signals and wavelet transforms

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

This paper describes bloodflow velocimetry using wavelet transforms and wideband signals. Acoustic signals with high fractional bandwidths and/or large time-bandwidth products are processed with wideband/wavelet techniques, thereby removing many of the narrowband assumptions typically invoked. The received signals are assumed to be reflected from particles moving in the blood stream. Instead of measuring the Doppler shift associated with the reflection, and time-scaling of the signal is obtained. This time-scaling more accurately reflects the effects of motion on the signals than does a Doppler shift since a Doppler shift is an approximation to time-scaling. The continuous wavelet transform processing is then used to obtain the axial velocity of scatterers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1222-1223
Number of pages2
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume16
Issue numberpt 2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994
EventProceedings of the 16th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Part 1 (of 2) - Baltimore, MD, USA
Duration: Nov 3 1994Nov 6 1994

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Wavelet Analysis
Rheology
Doppler effect
Doppler Effect
Velocity measurement
Wavelet transforms
Bandwidth
Blood
Acoustics
Processing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

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abstract = "This paper describes bloodflow velocimetry using wavelet transforms and wideband signals. Acoustic signals with high fractional bandwidths and/or large time-bandwidth products are processed with wideband/wavelet techniques, thereby removing many of the narrowband assumptions typically invoked. The received signals are assumed to be reflected from particles moving in the blood stream. Instead of measuring the Doppler shift associated with the reflection, and time-scaling of the signal is obtained. This time-scaling more accurately reflects the effects of motion on the signals than does a Doppler shift since a Doppler shift is an approximation to time-scaling. The continuous wavelet transform processing is then used to obtain the axial velocity of scatterers.",
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Bloodflow velocimetry using wideband signals and wavelet transforms. / Weiss, Lora G.

In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings, Vol. 16, No. pt 2, 01.12.1994, p. 1222-1223.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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