Blunted Fenfluramine-Evoked Prolactin Secretion in Hypertensive Rats

Sean Stocker, Matthew F. Muldoon, Alan F. Sved

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasma prolactin (PRL) levels after acute administration of fenfluramine (FEN) have been used as a probe of brain serotonin activity. FEN-evoked increases in PRL levels inversely correlate with arterial blood pressure (ABP) in humans (Muldoon et al. Hypertension. 1998;32:972-975), thereby suggesting that brain serotonin activity may be reduced in hypertension. The present study sought to determine whether the relation between FEN-evoked PRL levels and ABP was present in two rat models of hypertension. Experiments were performed in awake male rats that were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters 2 days before experiments. FEN (3.0 mg/kg IV) significantly increased plasma PRL levels in both spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY); however, FEN-evoked PRL levels were significantly lower in SHR compared with WKY, though baseline levels were similar between strains. Similar results were obtained in rats with chronic hypertension produced by figure-8 renal wrap plus contralateral nephrectomy. In contrast, the increase in PRL levels evoked by the serotonin receptor agonist m-CPP or the dopamine receptor antagonist eticlopride did not differ between SHR and WKY, indicating that PRL secretion is not generally blunted in chronic hypertensive rats. Furthermore, FEN-evoked PRL levels were not attenuated in rats made acutely hypertensive by an infusion of the α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Thus, the present findings are consistent with the human data and suggest that chronic hypertension is associated with a presynaptic alteration in brain serotonin function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-724
Number of pages6
JournalHypertension
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Fenfluramine
Prolactin
Inbred WKY Rats
Hypertension
Inbred SHR Rats
Serotonin
eticlopride
Arterial Pressure
Brain
Serotonin Receptor Agonists
Adrenergic Agonists
Dopamine Antagonists
Phenylephrine
Thigh
Nephrectomy
Catheters
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Stocker, Sean ; Muldoon, Matthew F. ; Sved, Alan F. / Blunted Fenfluramine-Evoked Prolactin Secretion in Hypertensive Rats. In: Hypertension. 2003 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 719-724.
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Blunted Fenfluramine-Evoked Prolactin Secretion in Hypertensive Rats. / Stocker, Sean; Muldoon, Matthew F.; Sved, Alan F.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 42, No. 4, 01.01.2003, p. 719-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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