Body image and HIV risk among college students

Meghan M. Gillen, Charlotte N. Markey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To focus on the role of sex, race/ethnicity, and body image in HIV-protective behaviors. Methods: Undergraduates (N = 277; 53% women; M = 19.27 years old) from the United States completed a survey on HIV-related behaviors and body image (appearance orientation and appearance evaluation). Results: Women and African Americans/Blacks were more likely to have ever had an HIV test. African Americans/Blacks and individuals who had more positive evaluations of their appearance were more likely to have ever asked a partner's HIV status and to have asked a partner to get tested for HIV. Conclusions: Findings indicate low rates of HIV testing and communication with a partner about HIV, suggesting the importance of sexual health intervention and education programs for college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)816-822
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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body image
Body Image
HIV
Students
evaluation
ethnicity
student
communication
African Americans
health
education
Reproductive Health
American
Health Education
Communication

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Gillen, Meghan M. ; Markey, Charlotte N. / Body image and HIV risk among college students. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 6. pp. 816-822.
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Body image and HIV risk among college students. / Gillen, Meghan M.; Markey, Charlotte N.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 6, 01.11.2014, p. 816-822.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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