Body mass index, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption and cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx: Modeling odds ratios in pooled case-control data

Jay H. Lubin, Mia M. Gaudet, Andrew F. Olshan, Karl Kelsey, Paolo Boffetta, Paul Brennan, Xavier Castellsague, Chu Chen, Maria Paula Curado, Luigino Dal Maso, Alexander W. Daudt, Eleonora Fabianova, Leticia Fernandez, Victor Wünsch-Filho, Silvia Franceschi, Rolando Herrero, Sergio Koifman, Carlo La Vecchia, Philip Lazarus, Fabio LeviJolanta Lissowska, Ioan Nicolae Mates, Elena Matos, Michael McClean, Ana Menezes, Hal Morgenstern, Joshua Muscat, Jose Eluf Neto, Mark P. Purdue, Peter Rudnai, Stephen M. Schwartz, Oxana Shangina, Erich M. Sturgis, Neonilia Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Renato Talamini, Qingyi Wei, Deborah Winn, Zuo Feng Zhang, Mia Hashibe, Richard B. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Odds ratios for head and neck cancer increase with greater cigarette and alcohol use and lower body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height2 (m2)). Using data from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium, the authors conducted a formal analysis of BMI as a modifier of smoking-and alcohol-related effects. Analysis of never and current smokers included 6,333 cases, while analysis of never drinkers and consumers of ≤10 drinks/day included 8,452 cases. There were 8,000 or more controls, depending on the analysis. Odds ratios for all sites increased with lower BMI, greater smoking, and greater drinking. In polytomous regression, odds ratios for BMI (P = 0.65), smoking (P = 0.52), and drinking (P = 0.73) were homogeneous for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers. Odds ratios for BMI and drinking were greater for oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer (P < 0.01), while smoking odds ratios were greater for laryngeal cancer (P < 0.01). Lower BMI enhanced smoking-and drinking-related odds ratios for oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer (P < 0.01), while BMI did not modify smoking and drinking odds ratios for laryngeal cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1250-1261
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume171
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

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