Body surveillance and affective judgments of physical activity in daily life

Jenna D. Gilchrist, Eva Pila, Kristen M. Lucibello, Catherine M. Sabiston, David E. Conroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Affective judgments are one of the strongest predictors of physical activity. Engaging in body surveillance during physical activity is theorized to reduce access to pleasant affective experiences thereby compromising the influence of affective judgments. However, empirical tests of this relationship are lacking. This study examined associations between body surveillance during physical activity and affective judgments (i.e., enjoyment and pleasure) of physical activity. Participants (N = 89; 53 % women, Mage = 20.32 years; SDage = 1.59) completed an experience sampling protocol for 7 days and provided 7 self-reports/day. Participants reported their body surveillance when engaged in physical activity followed by their affective judgments of physical activity. At the within-person level, participants reported more negative affective judgments during instances when body surveillance was higher than usual. At the between-person level, participants higher in body surveillance reported more negative affective judgments on average. These findings extend correlates of body surveillance to include less favorable affective judgments. Although there is support for targeting affective judgments to promote physical activity, the utility of such efforts may be limited if body surveillance is present. These findings point to a new target for potentially enhancing affective judgements and the promotion of physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalBody Image
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Body surveillance and affective judgments of physical activity in daily life'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this