Bounding uncertainty: Computational mechanics used to analyze the structural correlates of early hominid locomotion

R. B. Eckhardt, K. Galik, A. J. Kuperavage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Late Miocene fossils from the Lukeino Formation of Kenya's Tugen Hills have provided the earliest direct evidence for bipedal locomotion in a human ancestor. Here were explore the application of computational mechanics to understanding more fully the attributes of these fossil remains as well as their implications for potentially modifying probabilities of some chaotic state changes in femur structure of extant humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication3rd M.I.T. Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics
Pages191-193
Number of pages3
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event3rd M.I.T. Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Jun 14 2005Jun 17 2005

Publication series

Name3rd M.I.T. Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics

Other

Other3rd M.I.T. Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period6/14/056/17/05

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Computational Mathematics

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