Brain response to food cues varying in portion size is associated with individual differences in the portion size effect in children

Kathleen Loralee Keller, Laural K. English, S. Nicole Fearnbach, Marlou Lasschuijt, Kaitlin Anderson, Maria Bermudez, Jennifer O. Fisher, Barbara Jean Rolls, Stephen Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large portions promote intake of energy dense foods (i.e., the portion size effect–PSE), but the neurobiological drivers of this effect are not known. We tested the association between blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) brain response to food images varied by portion size (PS) and energy density (ED) and children's intake at test-meals of high- and low-ED foods served at varying portions. Children (N = 47; age 7–10 years) participated in a within-subjects, crossover study consisting of 4 meals of increasing PS of high- and low-ED foods and 1 fMRI to evaluate food images at 2 levels of PS (Large, Small) and 2 levels of ED (High, Low). Contrast values between PS conditions (e.g., Large PS - Small PS) were calculated from BOLD signal in brain regions implicated in cognitive control and reward and input as covariates in mixed models to determine if they moderated the PSE curve. Results showed a significant effect of PS on intake. Responses to Large relative to Small PS in brain regions implicated in salience (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex) were positively associated with the linear slope (i.e., increase in intake from baseline) of the PSE curve, but negatively associated with the quadratic coefficient for the total meal. Responses to Large PS High ED relative to Small PS High ED cues in regions associated with cognitive control (e.g., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were negatively associated with the linear slope of the PSE curve for high-ED foods. Brain responses to PS cues were associated with individual differences in children's susceptibility to overeating from large portions. Responses in food salience regions positively associated with PSE susceptibility while activation in control regions negatively associated with PSE susceptibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-151
Number of pages13
JournalAppetite
Volume125
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Portion Size
Individuality
Cues
Food
Brain
Prefrontal Cortex
Meals
Oxygen
Hyperphagia
Specific Gravity
Energy Intake
Reward
Cross-Over Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Keller, Kathleen Loralee ; English, Laural K. ; Fearnbach, S. Nicole ; Lasschuijt, Marlou ; Anderson, Kaitlin ; Bermudez, Maria ; Fisher, Jennifer O. ; Rolls, Barbara Jean ; Wilson, Stephen. / Brain response to food cues varying in portion size is associated with individual differences in the portion size effect in children. In: Appetite. 2018 ; Vol. 125. pp. 139-151.
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Brain response to food cues varying in portion size is associated with individual differences in the portion size effect in children. / Keller, Kathleen Loralee; English, Laural K.; Fearnbach, S. Nicole; Lasschuijt, Marlou; Anderson, Kaitlin; Bermudez, Maria; Fisher, Jennifer O.; Rolls, Barbara Jean; Wilson, Stephen.

In: Appetite, Vol. 125, 01.06.2018, p. 139-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - English, Laural K.

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