Breakfast consumption and its socio-demographic and lifestyle correlates in schoolchildren in 41 countries participating in the HBSC study

Carine Vereecken, Marie Dupuy, Mette Rasmussen, Colette Kelly, Tonja R. Nansel, Haleama Al Sabbah, Daniela Baldassari, Marina Delgrande Jordan, Lea Maes, Birgit V.L. Niclasen, Namanjeet Ahluwalia, Ursula Mager, Patrick de Smet, Anna Alexandrova, Ian Janssen, František Krch, Mai Maser, Kristiina Ojala, Birgit Niclassen, Ágnes NémethMariano Giacchi, Paola Dalmasso, Stefania Rossi, Giacomo Lazzeri, Iveta Pudule, Hanna Kololo, Catrinel Craciun, Aurora Szentagotai, Martina Baskova, Marina Delgrande, Oya Ercan, Jing Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To investigate associations of daily breakfast consumption (DBC) with demographic and lifestyle factors in 41 countries. Methods: Design: Survey including nationally representative samples of 11-15 year olds (n = 204,534) (HBSC 2005-2006). Statistics: Multilevel logistic regression analyses Results: DBC varied from 33% (Greek girls)to 75% (Portuguese boys). Results: In most countries, lower DBC was noticed in girls, older adolescents, those with lower family affluence and those living in single-parent families. DBC was positively associated with healthy lifestyle behaviours and negatively with unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Conclusion: Breakfast skipping deserves attention in preventive programs. It is common among adolescents, especially girls, older adolescents and those from disadvantaged families. Conclusion: The results indicate that DBC can serve as an indicator to identify children at risk for unhealthy lifestyle behaviours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S180-S190
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume54
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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