Bridging taxonomic and disciplinary divides in infectious disease

Elizabeth T. Borer, Janis Antonovics, Linda L. Kinkel, Peter John Hudson, Peter Daszak, Matthew Joseph Ferrari, Karen A. Garrett, Colin R. Parrish, Andrew Fraser Read, David M. Rizzo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pathogens traverse disciplinary and taxonomic boundaries, yet infectious disease research occurs in many separate disciplines including plant pathology, veterinary and human medicine, and ecological and evolutionary sciences. These disciplines have different traditions, goals, and terminology, creating gaps in communication. Bridging these disciplinary and taxonomic gaps promises novel insights and important synergistic advances in control of infectious disease. An approach integrated across the plant-animal divide would advance our understanding of disease by quantifying critical processes including transmission, community interactions, pathogen evolution, and complexity at multiple spatial and temporal scales. These advances require more substantial investment in basic disease research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-267
Number of pages7
JournalEcoHealth
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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infectious disease
Communicable Diseases
pathogen
Plant Pathology
Veterinary Medicine
pathology
terminology
integrated approach
Research
Terminology
medicine
Communication
communication
animal
science

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Borer, E. T., Antonovics, J., Kinkel, L. L., Hudson, P. J., Daszak, P., Ferrari, M. J., ... Rizzo, D. M. (2011). Bridging taxonomic and disciplinary divides in infectious disease. EcoHealth, 8(3), 261-267. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10393-011-0718-6
Borer, Elizabeth T. ; Antonovics, Janis ; Kinkel, Linda L. ; Hudson, Peter John ; Daszak, Peter ; Ferrari, Matthew Joseph ; Garrett, Karen A. ; Parrish, Colin R. ; Read, Andrew Fraser ; Rizzo, David M. / Bridging taxonomic and disciplinary divides in infectious disease. In: EcoHealth. 2011 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 261-267.
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Borer, ET, Antonovics, J, Kinkel, LL, Hudson, PJ, Daszak, P, Ferrari, MJ, Garrett, KA, Parrish, CR, Read, AF & Rizzo, DM 2011, 'Bridging taxonomic and disciplinary divides in infectious disease', EcoHealth, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 261-267. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10393-011-0718-6

Bridging taxonomic and disciplinary divides in infectious disease. / Borer, Elizabeth T.; Antonovics, Janis; Kinkel, Linda L.; Hudson, Peter John; Daszak, Peter; Ferrari, Matthew Joseph; Garrett, Karen A.; Parrish, Colin R.; Read, Andrew Fraser; Rizzo, David M.

In: EcoHealth, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.09.2011, p. 261-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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