Bridging the gap: use of confocal microscopy in food research

Y. Vodovotz, E. Vittadini, J. Coupland, D. J. McClements, P. Chinachoti

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), one of the most powerful techniques in multidimensional and chemical microscopy, has the potential applications in food research. The method not only provides an image with better resolution than conventional light microscopy or fluorescence microscopy, but also provides an opportunity to observe a 3-D image without the need to physically section and observe the sample in the z-direction. Additionally, it can distinguish the spatial location of different components by detecting fluorescence from dyes specific to different chemical species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages8
Number of pages1
Volume50
No6
Specialist publicationFood Technology
StatePublished - Jun 1 1996

Fingerprint

food research
Confocal Microscopy
Microscopy
Food
chemical speciation
Three-Dimensional Imaging
confocal laser scanning microscopy
fluorescence microscopy
Fluorescence Microscopy
Research
dyes
light microscopy
microscopy
Coloring Agents
Fluorescence
fluorescence
Light
methodology
sampling
confocal microscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Vodovotz, Y., Vittadini, E., Coupland, J., McClements, D. J., & Chinachoti, P. (1996). Bridging the gap: use of confocal microscopy in food research. Food Technology, 50(6), 8.
Vodovotz, Y. ; Vittadini, E. ; Coupland, J. ; McClements, D. J. ; Chinachoti, P. / Bridging the gap : use of confocal microscopy in food research. In: Food Technology. 1996 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 8.
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Vodovotz, Y, Vittadini, E, Coupland, J, McClements, DJ & Chinachoti, P 1996, 'Bridging the gap: use of confocal microscopy in food research' Food Technology, vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 8.

Bridging the gap : use of confocal microscopy in food research. / Vodovotz, Y.; Vittadini, E.; Coupland, J.; McClements, D. J.; Chinachoti, P.

In: Food Technology, Vol. 50, No. 6, 01.06.1996, p. 8.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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Vodovotz Y, Vittadini E, Coupland J, McClements DJ, Chinachoti P. Bridging the gap: use of confocal microscopy in food research. Food Technology. 1996 Jun 1;50(6):8.