Broad geographic sampling reveals the shared basis and environmental correlates of seasonal adaptation in drosophila

Heather E. Machado, Alan O. Bergland, Ryan Taylor, Susanne Tilk, Emily Behrman, Kelly Dyer, Daniel K. Fabian, Thomas Flatt, Josefa González, Talia L. Karasov, Bernard Kim, Iryna Kozeretska, Brian P. Lazzaro, Thomas J.S. Merritt, John E. Pool, Katherine O’brien, Subhash Rajpurohit, Paula R. Roy, Stephen W. Schaeffer, Svitlana SergaPaul Schmidt, Dmitri A. Petrov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

To advance our understanding of adaptation to temporally varying selection pressures, we identified signatures of seasonal adaptation occurring in parallel among Drosophila melanogaster populations. Specifically, we estimated allele frequencies genome-wide from flies sampled early and late in the growing season from 20 widely dispersed populations. We identified parallel seasonal allele frequency shifts across North America and Europe, demonstrating that seasonal adaptation is a general phenomenon of temperate fly populations. Seasonally fluctuating polymorphisms are enriched in large chromosomal inversions and we find a broad concordance between seasonal and spatial allele frequency change. The direction of allele frequency change at seasonally variable polymorphisms can be predicted by weather conditions in the weeks prior to sampling, linking the environment and the genomic response to selection. Our results suggest that fluctuating selection is an important evolutionary force affecting patterns of genetic variation in Drosophila.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere67577
JournaleLife
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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