Brothers Leading Healthy Lives: Outcomes from the pilot testing of a culturally and contextually congruent HIV prevention intervention for black male college students.

Robert E. Aronson, Kelly L. Rulison, Louis F. Graham, Regina Mc Coy Pulliam, Warner L. McGee, Jeffrey D. Labban, Deirdre Dingman, Scott D. Rhodes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used a treatment group-only design to pilot test a newly developed intervention to increase condom use among higher risk heterosexually active African American/black male college students. A community-based participatory research partnership developed the intervention called Brothers Leading Healthy Lives. Following an initial screening of 245 men, 81 eligible men were contacted for participation. Of the 64 men who agreed to participate, 57 completed the intervention and 54 of those completed the 3-month follow-up assessment, for a 93% completion rate. Results show significant changes between the baseline and 3-month follow-up assessments in behavioral outcomes, including reductions in unprotected sex, increase in protection during last intercourse, and fewer condom use errors. Most potential mediators (knowledge, attitudes, intentions, and condom use self-efficacy) also changed significantly in the expected direction. These demonstrated changes provide good evidence that men exposed to this intervention will see changes that reduce their risk for HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-393
Number of pages18
JournalAIDS education and prevention : official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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