Buddy

Focus group research on the perceived influence of messages in urban music on the health beliefs and behaviors of African American undergraduate females

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study the author uses the Health Belief Model to explore the perceived influence of urban music lyrics (i.e., Musiq Soulchild’s, Buddy) on the sexual health beliefs and behaviors of African American female undergraduate students. Research documents the potential influence of television viewing (i.e., media images), including music videos, upon the beliefs and sexual behaviors of African American youth (Watkins, 2000; Win-good et al, 2003). However, limited, if any, published research moves beyond the images and specifically examines the influence of listening to lyrics, and the sexual beliefs and behavior of youth (Martino et al., 2006). Using data gathered from 28 participants via focus groups, the researcher explored the perceptions of this at-risk population. The findings support a disturbing trend of casual sex in noncommitted relationships, both in music lyrics and the beliefs and behaviors of focus group participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-27
Number of pages7
JournalQualitative Research Reports in Communication
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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music
Health
Television
health
Group
Students
television
video
American
trend
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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abstract = "In this study the author uses the Health Belief Model to explore the perceived influence of urban music lyrics (i.e., Musiq Soulchild’s, Buddy) on the sexual health beliefs and behaviors of African American female undergraduate students. Research documents the potential influence of television viewing (i.e., media images), including music videos, upon the beliefs and sexual behaviors of African American youth (Watkins, 2000; Win-good et al, 2003). However, limited, if any, published research moves beyond the images and specifically examines the influence of listening to lyrics, and the sexual beliefs and behavior of youth (Martino et al., 2006). Using data gathered from 28 participants via focus groups, the researcher explored the perceptions of this at-risk population. The findings support a disturbing trend of casual sex in noncommitted relationships, both in music lyrics and the beliefs and behaviors of focus group participants.",
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