Burden of proof: The evidence clinicians require before implementing an intervention

Brian Allen, Natalie E. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Greater implementation of evidence-based practice for children and adolescents is a current emphasis in the mental health field; however, there is a need to understand how best to disseminate these interventions and convince community clinicians to use them. Method: A sample of 255 clinicians reported on the likelihood that they would use an intervention given various types of evidence. Results: Case studies and clinical trials with an active or placebo control group scored as the most preferred types of evidence; however, more positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice predicted preferences for clinical trials, but were not related to case studies. Conclusion: Implementation of evidence-based practice may be improved by greater dissemination of case studies demonstrating the use of these interventions in 'real world' settings. In addition, fostering a greater appreciation of research-derived interventions among clinicians appears necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-56
Number of pages5
JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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Evidence-Based Practice
Clinical Trials
Foster Home Care
Mental Health
Placebos
Control Groups
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Burden of proof : The evidence clinicians require before implementing an intervention. / Allen, Brian; Armstrong, Natalie E.

In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 52-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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