Burnout and its relationship with perceived stress, self-efficacy, depression, social support, and programmatic factors in general surgery residents

Matthew R. Smeds, Matthew R. Janko, Steven Allen, Kwame Amankwah, Tracey Arnell, Parswa Ansari, Marcus Balters, Donald Hess, Elizabeth Ferguson, Patrick Jackson, Mary K. Kimbrough, David Knight, Melissa Johnson, Michael Porter, Brian D. Shames, Rebecca Schroll, Julia Shelton, Jeffrey Sussman, Peter Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Burnout affects surgical residents’ well-being. Objective: We sought to identify factors associated with burnout among surgery residents. Methods: An electronic/anonymous survey was sent to surgical residents at 18 programs, consisting of demographic/programmatic questions and validated scales for burnout, depression, perceived stress, self-efficacy, and social support. Residents were grouped into quartiles based off burnout, and predictors were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: 42% of residents surveyed completed it. Burnout was associated with depression, higher perceived stress/debt, fewer weekends off, less programmatic social events, and residents were less likely to reconsider surgery if given the chance. Low burnout was associated with lower depression/stress, higher social support/self-efficacy, more weekends off per month, program mentorship, lower debt, and residents being more likely to choose surgery again if given the chance. On multivariate analysis, higher depression/perceived stress were associated with burnout, and lower burnout scores were associated with lower stress/higher self-efficacy. Conclusions: Burnout in surgery residents is associated with higher levels of depression and perceived stress. The addition of programmatic social events, limiting weekend work, and formal mentoring programs may decrease burnout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)907-912
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume219
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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