Caffeine administration does not alter salivary -Amylase activity in young male daily caffeine consumers

Laura Cousino Klein, Courtney A. Whetzel, Jeanette M. Bennett, Frank E. Ritter, Urs M. Nater, Michael Schoelles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To follow up on a recent report from our lab [Hum Psychopharmacol 25:359-367, 2010.] we examined the effects of caffeine on salivary -amylase (sAA) activity in response to an engaging, non-stressful task in healthy young males (age 18-30 yrs) who consumed caffeine on a daily basis. Using a placebo-controlled, double-blind, between-subjects design, 45 men received either placebo, 200 mg or 400 mg of caffeine (Vivarin®). Participants then rested for 20 minutes, and performed a 20-minute computerized air traffic controller-like task that was cognitively engaging but not stressful. Saliva samples (assayed for sAA and cortisol), blood pressure, and heart rate were taken before (baseline) and 15 minutes after the computerized task. Results: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and sAA activity increased across the laboratory session (F's > 9.20, p's < 0.05); salivary cortisol levels decreased (F = 16.17, p < 0.05). There were no main effects for caffeine administration on sAA, salivary cortisol, or cardiovascular measures, and caffeine did not interact with the task to alter these measures. Conclusions: Laboratory administered caffeine does not alter sAA activity, even when sAA activity is stimulated by participating in a cognitively engaging task. These data demonstrate that caffeine administration does not affect sAA activity, at least in healthy young men who regularly consume caffeine. Results support recent findings that basal caffeine levels in habitual caffeine users are not associated with basal sAA activity and that daily caffeine intake and diurnal sAA activity are not related.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number30
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 13 2014

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Amylases
Caffeine
Hydrocortisone
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure
Placebos
Saliva
Heart Rate
Air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Klein, Laura Cousino ; Whetzel, Courtney A. ; Bennett, Jeanette M. ; Ritter, Frank E. ; Nater, Urs M. ; Schoelles, Michael. / Caffeine administration does not alter salivary -Amylase activity in young male daily caffeine consumers. In: BMC Research Notes. 2014 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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Caffeine administration does not alter salivary -Amylase activity in young male daily caffeine consumers. / Klein, Laura Cousino; Whetzel, Courtney A.; Bennett, Jeanette M.; Ritter, Frank E.; Nater, Urs M.; Schoelles, Michael.

In: BMC Research Notes, Vol. 7, No. 1, 30, 13.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Caffeine administration does not alter salivary -Amylase activity in young male daily caffeine consumers

AU - Klein, Laura Cousino

AU - Whetzel, Courtney A.

AU - Bennett, Jeanette M.

AU - Ritter, Frank E.

AU - Nater, Urs M.

AU - Schoelles, Michael

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N2 - Background: To follow up on a recent report from our lab [Hum Psychopharmacol 25:359-367, 2010.] we examined the effects of caffeine on salivary -amylase (sAA) activity in response to an engaging, non-stressful task in healthy young males (age 18-30 yrs) who consumed caffeine on a daily basis. Using a placebo-controlled, double-blind, between-subjects design, 45 men received either placebo, 200 mg or 400 mg of caffeine (Vivarin®). Participants then rested for 20 minutes, and performed a 20-minute computerized air traffic controller-like task that was cognitively engaging but not stressful. Saliva samples (assayed for sAA and cortisol), blood pressure, and heart rate were taken before (baseline) and 15 minutes after the computerized task. Results: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and sAA activity increased across the laboratory session (F's > 9.20, p's < 0.05); salivary cortisol levels decreased (F = 16.17, p < 0.05). There were no main effects for caffeine administration on sAA, salivary cortisol, or cardiovascular measures, and caffeine did not interact with the task to alter these measures. Conclusions: Laboratory administered caffeine does not alter sAA activity, even when sAA activity is stimulated by participating in a cognitively engaging task. These data demonstrate that caffeine administration does not affect sAA activity, at least in healthy young men who regularly consume caffeine. Results support recent findings that basal caffeine levels in habitual caffeine users are not associated with basal sAA activity and that daily caffeine intake and diurnal sAA activity are not related.

AB - Background: To follow up on a recent report from our lab [Hum Psychopharmacol 25:359-367, 2010.] we examined the effects of caffeine on salivary -amylase (sAA) activity in response to an engaging, non-stressful task in healthy young males (age 18-30 yrs) who consumed caffeine on a daily basis. Using a placebo-controlled, double-blind, between-subjects design, 45 men received either placebo, 200 mg or 400 mg of caffeine (Vivarin®). Participants then rested for 20 minutes, and performed a 20-minute computerized air traffic controller-like task that was cognitively engaging but not stressful. Saliva samples (assayed for sAA and cortisol), blood pressure, and heart rate were taken before (baseline) and 15 minutes after the computerized task. Results: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and sAA activity increased across the laboratory session (F's > 9.20, p's < 0.05); salivary cortisol levels decreased (F = 16.17, p < 0.05). There were no main effects for caffeine administration on sAA, salivary cortisol, or cardiovascular measures, and caffeine did not interact with the task to alter these measures. Conclusions: Laboratory administered caffeine does not alter sAA activity, even when sAA activity is stimulated by participating in a cognitively engaging task. These data demonstrate that caffeine administration does not affect sAA activity, at least in healthy young men who regularly consume caffeine. Results support recent findings that basal caffeine levels in habitual caffeine users are not associated with basal sAA activity and that daily caffeine intake and diurnal sAA activity are not related.

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