Calcium supplementation reduces blood pressure during pregnancy

Results of a randomized controlled clinical trial

J. Villar, John Repke, J. M. Belizan, G. Pareja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fifty-two healthy pregnant women were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. After the 26th week of gestation, the women were given either 1.5 g of elemental calcium per day or a placebo. Subjects in the calcium group, after adjustment for race and initial blood pressure (BP), had a term mean systolic and diastolic BP value of 4-5 mmHg lower than those in the placebo group (P < .05). The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was 11.1% in the placebo group and 4.0% in the calcium group, a nonsignificant difference. Combining these values with previous data, we found a dose-effect relationship between calcium intake and BP reduction during the third trimester of pregnancy. Further research should be directed at understanding the mechanism of this effect and trying to demonstrate a reduction in pregnancy-induced hypertension with calcium supplementation in a larger population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-322
Number of pages6
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume70
Issue number3 PART I
StatePublished - 1987

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Randomized Controlled Trials
Blood Pressure
Calcium
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Placebos
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Pregnant Women
Incidence
Research
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

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Calcium supplementation reduces blood pressure during pregnancy : Results of a randomized controlled clinical trial. / Villar, J.; Repke, John; Belizan, J. M.; Pareja, G.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 70, No. 3 PART I, 1987, p. 317-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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