California Dreaming: Replicating the ESA Model, Unusual Cases, and Comparative State Political Analysis

Jennifer Wolak, David Lynn Lowery, Virginia Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cross-sectional analyses of American state data testing models in which state size is a meaningful predictor face a nonobvious problem of limited observations. Quite simply, the limited number of large states, and especially the presence of the uniquely large state of California, provides few observations to anchor regression estimates. We explore this problem with close attention to Gray and Lowery’s (1996a) energy, stability, area (ESA) model of interest system density, both replicating their results with new data and highlighting the utility and limitations of analyzing unusual cases in comparative state research. After replicating the ESA model, several diagnostics for analyzing outliers, leverage, and influence are examined. We show how supplemental data analyses can be used to assess the source, severity, and, sometimes, the solution of the problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-272
Number of pages18
JournalState Politics and Policy Quarterly
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 11 2001

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energy
diagnostic
regression
Energy
Dreaming
Outliers
Testing
Diagnostics
Anchor
Predictors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Wolak, Jennifer ; Lowery, David Lynn ; Gray, Virginia. / California Dreaming : Replicating the ESA Model, Unusual Cases, and Comparative State Political Analysis. In: State Politics and Policy Quarterly. 2001 ; Vol. 1, No. 3. pp. 255-272.
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California Dreaming : Replicating the ESA Model, Unusual Cases, and Comparative State Political Analysis. / Wolak, Jennifer; Lowery, David Lynn; Gray, Virginia.

In: State Politics and Policy Quarterly, Vol. 1, No. 3, 11.05.2001, p. 255-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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