Caloric, but not macronutrient, compensation by humans for required-eating occasions with meals and snack varying in fat and carbohydrate

Richard W. Foltin, Barbara J. Rolls, Timothy H. Moran, Thomas H. Kelly, Amy L. McNelis, Marian W. Fischman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six subjects participated in a residential study assessing the effects of covert macronutrient and energy manipulations during three required-eating occasions (breakfast, lunch, and afternoon snack) on total macronutrient and energy intakes. Overall, energy content of the occasions varied between ≈ 3000 and ≈ 7000 kJ (≈700 and ≈1700 kcal) with the majority of the differential derived from either fat or carbohydrate (CHO). Each condition (high, medium, and low fat; high, medium, and low CHO; and no required eating) was examined for 2 d. Subjects compensated for the energy content of the required occasions such that only under the low-CHO condition (11 297 ± 3314 kJ) was total daily energy intake lower than that observed in the absence of required occasions (13 297 ± 1356 kJ). Only total energy intake under the high-fat condition (12 326 ± 2548 kJ) was significantly different from its matched CHO condition (high-CHO condition: 14665 ± 2686 kJ). In contrast to the clear evidence for caloric compensation, there were no differential effects of condition on macronutrient intake, ie, there was no macronutrient compensation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-342
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1992

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Snacks
Energy Intake
Meals
Eating
Fats
Carbohydrates
Lunch
Breakfast

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Foltin, Richard W. ; Rolls, Barbara J. ; Moran, Timothy H. ; Kelly, Thomas H. ; McNelis, Amy L. ; Fischman, Marian W. / Caloric, but not macronutrient, compensation by humans for required-eating occasions with meals and snack varying in fat and carbohydrate. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1992 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 331-342.
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Caloric, but not macronutrient, compensation by humans for required-eating occasions with meals and snack varying in fat and carbohydrate. / Foltin, Richard W.; Rolls, Barbara J.; Moran, Timothy H.; Kelly, Thomas H.; McNelis, Amy L.; Fischman, Marian W.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 55, No. 2, 02.1992, p. 331-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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