Can one predict when ultrasound will be useful with percutaneous liver biopsy?

Mejdi Ahmad, Thomas Riley III

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We previously showed that ultrasound altered position of biopsy in 15% of cases by demonstrating intervening structures. This study was designed to test whether one could predict in which cases ultrasound would be useful. METHODS: A standard percussion technique was used. The site chosen was marked. Criteria were established to indicate whether a move might be predicted to be likely. If 10 or more points were assigned, then it was predicted that ultrasound would change position. A difficult percussion was assigned 10 points; obesity, 5 points; and chest deformity, 5 points. The ultrasound was then applied to the marked spot in every case. If an intervening structure was present within 6 cm, the biopsy site was moved. Otherwise, the biopsy was taken from the marked site. RESULTS: One hundred seventeen consecutive liver biopsies were included between January 1999 and January 2000. The criteria predicted the desirability of nine moves. No moves were made, however, in these cases. In 17 cases (14.5%), moves were made because of intervening structures. None of the cases were predicted. A move was made in 1 of 23 obese patients. There was no statistical difference in moves made between obese and nonobese patients. CONCLUSIONS: Using criteria of difficult percussion, obesity, and unusual chest shape, we could not predict when ultrasound would be useful. This is in contrast to the belief that ultrasound can be applied to selected liver biopsies considered in advance to be more difficult, as in the obese patients, and instead suggests that to avoid intervening structures, one should apply ultrasound to all cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-549
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume96
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 13 2001

Fingerprint

Percussion
Biopsy
Liver
Thorax
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{9b33f8ef4c874c159ca977fea9289fe0,
title = "Can one predict when ultrasound will be useful with percutaneous liver biopsy?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We previously showed that ultrasound altered position of biopsy in 15{\%} of cases by demonstrating intervening structures. This study was designed to test whether one could predict in which cases ultrasound would be useful. METHODS: A standard percussion technique was used. The site chosen was marked. Criteria were established to indicate whether a move might be predicted to be likely. If 10 or more points were assigned, then it was predicted that ultrasound would change position. A difficult percussion was assigned 10 points; obesity, 5 points; and chest deformity, 5 points. The ultrasound was then applied to the marked spot in every case. If an intervening structure was present within 6 cm, the biopsy site was moved. Otherwise, the biopsy was taken from the marked site. RESULTS: One hundred seventeen consecutive liver biopsies were included between January 1999 and January 2000. The criteria predicted the desirability of nine moves. No moves were made, however, in these cases. In 17 cases (14.5{\%}), moves were made because of intervening structures. None of the cases were predicted. A move was made in 1 of 23 obese patients. There was no statistical difference in moves made between obese and nonobese patients. CONCLUSIONS: Using criteria of difficult percussion, obesity, and unusual chest shape, we could not predict when ultrasound would be useful. This is in contrast to the belief that ultrasound can be applied to selected liver biopsies considered in advance to be more difficult, as in the obese patients, and instead suggests that to avoid intervening structures, one should apply ultrasound to all cases.",
author = "Mejdi Ahmad and {Riley III}, Thomas",
year = "2001",
month = "3",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9270(00)02350-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "547--549",
journal = "American Journal of Gastroenterology",
issn = "0002-9270",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

Can one predict when ultrasound will be useful with percutaneous liver biopsy? / Ahmad, Mejdi; Riley III, Thomas.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 96, No. 2, 13.03.2001, p. 547-549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can one predict when ultrasound will be useful with percutaneous liver biopsy?

AU - Ahmad, Mejdi

AU - Riley III, Thomas

PY - 2001/3/13

Y1 - 2001/3/13

N2 - OBJECTIVE: We previously showed that ultrasound altered position of biopsy in 15% of cases by demonstrating intervening structures. This study was designed to test whether one could predict in which cases ultrasound would be useful. METHODS: A standard percussion technique was used. The site chosen was marked. Criteria were established to indicate whether a move might be predicted to be likely. If 10 or more points were assigned, then it was predicted that ultrasound would change position. A difficult percussion was assigned 10 points; obesity, 5 points; and chest deformity, 5 points. The ultrasound was then applied to the marked spot in every case. If an intervening structure was present within 6 cm, the biopsy site was moved. Otherwise, the biopsy was taken from the marked site. RESULTS: One hundred seventeen consecutive liver biopsies were included between January 1999 and January 2000. The criteria predicted the desirability of nine moves. No moves were made, however, in these cases. In 17 cases (14.5%), moves were made because of intervening structures. None of the cases were predicted. A move was made in 1 of 23 obese patients. There was no statistical difference in moves made between obese and nonobese patients. CONCLUSIONS: Using criteria of difficult percussion, obesity, and unusual chest shape, we could not predict when ultrasound would be useful. This is in contrast to the belief that ultrasound can be applied to selected liver biopsies considered in advance to be more difficult, as in the obese patients, and instead suggests that to avoid intervening structures, one should apply ultrasound to all cases.

AB - OBJECTIVE: We previously showed that ultrasound altered position of biopsy in 15% of cases by demonstrating intervening structures. This study was designed to test whether one could predict in which cases ultrasound would be useful. METHODS: A standard percussion technique was used. The site chosen was marked. Criteria were established to indicate whether a move might be predicted to be likely. If 10 or more points were assigned, then it was predicted that ultrasound would change position. A difficult percussion was assigned 10 points; obesity, 5 points; and chest deformity, 5 points. The ultrasound was then applied to the marked spot in every case. If an intervening structure was present within 6 cm, the biopsy site was moved. Otherwise, the biopsy was taken from the marked site. RESULTS: One hundred seventeen consecutive liver biopsies were included between January 1999 and January 2000. The criteria predicted the desirability of nine moves. No moves were made, however, in these cases. In 17 cases (14.5%), moves were made because of intervening structures. None of the cases were predicted. A move was made in 1 of 23 obese patients. There was no statistical difference in moves made between obese and nonobese patients. CONCLUSIONS: Using criteria of difficult percussion, obesity, and unusual chest shape, we could not predict when ultrasound would be useful. This is in contrast to the belief that ultrasound can be applied to selected liver biopsies considered in advance to be more difficult, as in the obese patients, and instead suggests that to avoid intervening structures, one should apply ultrasound to all cases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035123762&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035123762&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9270(00)02350-9

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9270(00)02350-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 11232704

AN - SCOPUS:0035123762

VL - 96

SP - 547

EP - 549

JO - American Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - American Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0002-9270

IS - 2

ER -