Can payments for watershed services help advance restoration of longleaf pine? A critically engaged research approach

R. Sean Sellers, Melissa M. Kreye, Tyler J. Carney, Lauren K. Ward, Damian C. Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Private forests in the southeastern US are critical for providing a variety of ecosystem services, including timber production and water resource protection. Restoration of longleaf pine (LLP) forests and savannas tends to enhance some ecosystem services, including water supply, over timber production. A variety of payments for watershed services (PWS) strategies have emerged to address the market failure associated with private forests and public water supply. The nature of these programs suggests that biodiversity protection may be a positive externality, or third-party benefit, to water resource protection. This paper uses a critically engaged research approach and expert interviews to investigate how PWS programs may help prevent land use change and pro-mote LLP restoration. We also offer recommendations on how to sustain emerging efforts to imple-ment PWS strategies while including LLP restoration objectives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number279
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalForests
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry

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