Cancer Screening in Older Adults

Ashley Snyder, Allison Magnuson, Amy Westcott

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

When screening for cancer in older adults, it is important to consider the risks of screening, how long it takes to benefit from screening, and the patient's comorbidities and life expectancy. Delivering high-value care requires the consideration of evidence-based screening guidelines and careful selection of patients. This article considers the impact of cancer. It explores perspectives on the costs of common cancer screening tests, illustrates how using life expectancy can help clinicians determine who will benefit most from screening, and provides tools to help clinicians discuss with their older patients when it may be appropriate to stop screening for cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1101-1110
Number of pages10
JournalMedical Clinics of North America
Volume100
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Early Detection of Cancer
Life Expectancy
Patient Selection
Comorbidity
Guidelines
Costs and Cost Analysis
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Snyder, Ashley ; Magnuson, Allison ; Westcott, Amy. / Cancer Screening in Older Adults. In: Medical Clinics of North America. 2016 ; Vol. 100, No. 5. pp. 1101-1110.
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Cancer Screening in Older Adults. / Snyder, Ashley; Magnuson, Allison; Westcott, Amy.

In: Medical Clinics of North America, Vol. 100, No. 5, 01.01.2016, p. 1101-1110.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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