Capstone or deadweight? Ineffieciency, duplication and inequity in South Africa's tertiary education system, 1910-93

Johannes Wolfgang Fedderke, Raphael de Kadt, John Luiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents time series on South African tertiary education. The data series presented cover inputs and outputs for the university, technical training and teacher training systems. Modern growth theory has emphasised the importance of human capital, though empirical studies have attempted to isolate human capital impacts through single aggregate measures that capture only a quantity of human capital dimension. While data analysis in the present study is exploratory in nature, we show that strong quality differentials exist both within and between different parts of the tertiary education system. The methodological implication for growth studies is that fully accounting for both the quantity and quality of human capital in aggregate human capital measures thus faces significant measurement difficulties. The data also establish that discrimination in the South African tertiary education was not simply a question of underresourcing of Black institutions. Quality of output was low, but attaining it was frequently very expensive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-400
Number of pages24
JournalCambridge Journal of Economics
Volume27
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1 2003

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Human capital
Inequity
South Africa
Education system
Tertiary education
Africa
Discrimination
Growth theory
Technical training
Teacher training
Empirical study

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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Capstone or deadweight? Ineffieciency, duplication and inequity in South Africa's tertiary education system, 1910-93. / Fedderke, Johannes Wolfgang; de Kadt, Raphael; Luiz, John.

In: Cambridge Journal of Economics, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.05.2003, p. 377-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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