Carbohydrate moiety of the Petunia inflata S3 protein is not required for self-incompatibility interactions between pollen and pistil

Balasulojini Karunanandaa, Shihshieh Huang, Teh Hui Kao

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53 Scopus citations

Abstract

For Petunia inflate and Nicotians alata, which display gametophytic self-incompatibility, S proteins (the products of the multiallelic S gene in the pistil) have been shown to control the pistil's ability to recognize and reject self-pollen. The biochemical mechanism for rejection of self-pollen by S proteins has been shown to involve their ribonuclease activity; however, the molecular basis for self/non-self recognition by S proteins is not yet understood. Here, we addressed whether the glycan chain of the S3 protein of P. inflata is involved in self/non-self recognition by producing a nonglycosylated S3 protein in transgenic plants and examining the effect of deglycosylation on the ability of the S3 protein to reject S3 pollen. The S3 gene was mutagenized by replacing the codon for Asn-29, which is the only potential N-glycosylation site of the S3 protein, with a codon for Asp, and the mutant S3 gene was introduced into P. inflata plants of the S1S2 genotype. Six transgenic plants that produced a normal level of the nonglycosylated S3 protein acquired the ability to reject S3 pollen completely. These results suggest that the carbohydrate moiety of the S3 protein does not play a role in recognition or rejection of self-pollen and that the S allele specificity determinant of the S3 protein and those S proteins that contain a single glycan chain at the same site as the S3 protein must reside in the amino acid sequence itself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1933-1940
Number of pages8
JournalPlant Cell
Volume6
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1994

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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