Cardiovascular disease and women’s health

Penny Margaret Kris-Etherton, Debra Krummel, Catherine Champagne, Kristin Moriarty, Abir Farhat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Contemporary dietary recommendations were formulated to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by decreasing hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, overweight/obesity, and diabetes mellitus. Presently, less than 20& of US women meet these recommendations. Because CVD is the leading cause of death in US women, there is a critical need to identify effective strategies to overcome obstacles they encounter in achieving healthy dietary practices. Understanding how to elicit long-term nutrition-related behavior changes in women could significantly affect the health of our nation by decreasing the risk of chronic diseases (including CVD) in women and in the many different target groups for whom they are caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-22
Number of pages15
JournalTopics in Clinical Nutrition
Volume11
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Women's Health
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hypercholesterolemia
Caregivers
Cause of Death
Diabetes Mellitus
Chronic Disease
Obesity
Hypertension
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Kris-Etherton, P. M., Krummel, D., Champagne, C., Moriarty, K., & Farhat, A. (1995). Cardiovascular disease and women’s health. Topics in Clinical Nutrition, 11(1), 8-22.
Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret ; Krummel, Debra ; Champagne, Catherine ; Moriarty, Kristin ; Farhat, Abir. / Cardiovascular disease and women’s health. In: Topics in Clinical Nutrition. 1995 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 8-22.
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Kris-Etherton, PM, Krummel, D, Champagne, C, Moriarty, K & Farhat, A 1995, 'Cardiovascular disease and women’s health', Topics in Clinical Nutrition, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 8-22.

Cardiovascular disease and women’s health. / Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret; Krummel, Debra; Champagne, Catherine; Moriarty, Kristin; Farhat, Abir.

In: Topics in Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 8-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Kris-Etherton PM, Krummel D, Champagne C, Moriarty K, Farhat A. Cardiovascular disease and women’s health. Topics in Clinical Nutrition. 1995 Jan 1;11(1):8-22.