Career choices and characteristics of african-american undergraduates majoring in criminal justice at historically black colleges and universities

Shaun L. Gabbidon, Everette B. Penn, Winston A. Richards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recent research has shown that African-Americans at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have increasingly selected criminal justice/criminology as their field of study and career choice (Gabbidon and Penn 1999). To explore this trend, the authors replicated the work of Krimmel and Tartaro (1999) by surveying 284 undergraduate criminal justice majors at several HBCUs; the study was designed to investigate whether the students' reasons for selecting criminal justice as a major and career choice were in line with those of the earlier study conducted at predominantly white institutions. Our findings show that, while students at the two types of universities seem to select criminal justice as a major for the same reasons-including the interesting nature of the subject matter and its relevance to the real world-undergraduates at HBCUs reported stronger attitudes towards entering the career for economic as well as for altruistic reasons such as protecting the Constitution, fighting oppression, and helping people solve problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-244
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Phytoremediation
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Plant Science

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