Cartilage-and bone-forming tumors and tumor-like lesions

Julie C. Fanburg-Smith, Mark D. Murphey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter discusses cartilage and bone-forming lesions in soft tissue. Many of these lesions have a more common intraosseous counterpart. Clinicopathologic features and genetic changes vary between these homologous intraosseous and extraskeletal tumors. From a historical viewpoint, most of these lesions have been well defined for at least the last one to five decades. Regarding cartilage tumors, Lichtenstein1 was the first to describe chondroma of soft parts in the hands and feet in 1964; this tumor had been previously described by Jaffe2 in 1958 in periarticular and intracapsular locations. Synovial chondromatosis was first described by Ambroise Paré in Monsters and Prodigies in 1558 and Laennec in 1813;3 in 1900, it was identified in the German literature by Reichel.4 Although Stout and Verner5 described extraskeletal chondrosarcomas in 1953, the most common variant, extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, was defined by Enzinger and Shiraki in 1972.6 Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma was first identified by Lichtenstein and Bernstein in 1959.7 Bone- or matrixproducing lesions also have been known for a long time. Although it has been known for more than a half-century that tumors can cause oncogenic osteomalacia,8 the histologic appearance of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor of the mixed connective tissue type was first reported by Weidner and Santa Cruz in 1987.9 Tumoral calcinosis has been recognized since 1899 by Duret; it was first described as "tumoral calcinosis" in 1943 by Inclan.10 Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease was originally recognized in 1958,11 but it was McCarty who linked pseudogout caused by crystals of this deposition disease in 1962.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationModern Soft Tissue Pathology
Subtitle of host publicationTumors and Non-Neoplastic Conditions
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages862-895
Number of pages34
ISBN (Electronic)9780511781049
ISBN (Print)9780521874090
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Cartilage
Bone and Bones
Chondrocalcinosis
Calcinosis
Neoplasms
Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma
Synovial Chondromatosis
Chondroma
Chondrosarcoma
Connective Tissue
Foot
Hand

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fanburg-Smith, J. C., & Murphey, M. D. (2010). Cartilage-and bone-forming tumors and tumor-like lesions. In Modern Soft Tissue Pathology: Tumors and Non-Neoplastic Conditions (pp. 862-895). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511781049.031
Fanburg-Smith, Julie C. ; Murphey, Mark D. / Cartilage-and bone-forming tumors and tumor-like lesions. Modern Soft Tissue Pathology: Tumors and Non-Neoplastic Conditions. Cambridge University Press, 2010. pp. 862-895
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Fanburg-Smith, JC & Murphey, MD 2010, Cartilage-and bone-forming tumors and tumor-like lesions. in Modern Soft Tissue Pathology: Tumors and Non-Neoplastic Conditions. Cambridge University Press, pp. 862-895. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511781049.031

Cartilage-and bone-forming tumors and tumor-like lesions. / Fanburg-Smith, Julie C.; Murphey, Mark D.

Modern Soft Tissue Pathology: Tumors and Non-Neoplastic Conditions. Cambridge University Press, 2010. p. 862-895.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Fanburg-Smith JC, Murphey MD. Cartilage-and bone-forming tumors and tumor-like lesions. In Modern Soft Tissue Pathology: Tumors and Non-Neoplastic Conditions. Cambridge University Press. 2010. p. 862-895 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511781049.031