Cascade models of synaptically stored memories

Stefano Fusi, Patrick J. Drew, L. F. Abbott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

281 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Storing memories of ongoing, everyday experiences requires a high degree of plasticity, but retaining these memories demands protection against changes induced by further activity and experience. Models in which memories are stored through switch-like transitions in synaptic efficacy are good at storing but bad at retaining memories if these transitions are likely, and they are poor at storage but good at retention if they are unlikely. We construct and study a model in which each synapse has a cascade of states with different levels of plasticity, connected by metaplastic transitions. This cascade model combines high levels of memory storage with long retention times and significantly outperforms alternative models. As a result, we suggest that memory storage requires synapses with multiple states exhibiting dynamics over a wide range of timescales, and we suggest experimental tests of this hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-611
Number of pages13
JournalNeuron
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2005

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Synapses
Retention (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Fusi, Stefano ; Drew, Patrick J. ; Abbott, L. F. / Cascade models of synaptically stored memories. In: Neuron. 2005 ; Vol. 45, No. 4. pp. 599-611.
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Cascade models of synaptically stored memories. / Fusi, Stefano; Drew, Patrick J.; Abbott, L. F.

In: Neuron, Vol. 45, No. 4, 17.02.2005, p. 599-611.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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