Case study: An infection-triggered, autoimmune subtype of anorexia nervosa

Mae S. Sokol, Nicola Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Certain cases of anorexia nervosa (AN) may be similar to the recently described subtype of childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder hypothesized to be one of the pediatric infection-triggered autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders (PITANDs). Method: Three clinical cases are reported. The first patient is a 12-year-old boy whose AN worsened acutely after a group A β-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection. His symptoms were alleviated after antibiotic treatment. Two other patients with possible PITANDs-related AN are described. Results: An infection-triggered process may contribute to the pathogenesis of a subtype of AN. Conclusions: Future research is needed to explore the nature of PITANDs and their relationship with AN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1128-1133
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Anorexia Nervosa
Infection
Pediatrics
Streptococcal Infections
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Anti-Bacterial Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Case study : An infection-triggered, autoimmune subtype of anorexia nervosa. / Sokol, Mae S.; Gray, Nicola.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 36, No. 8, 01.01.1997, p. 1128-1133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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