Cassini end-of-life escape trajectories to the outer planets

Masataka Okutsu, Chit Hong Yam, James M. Longuski, Nathan J. Strange

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigate Saturn-escape trajectories via Titan gravity assist as an option for a contamination-free, end-of-life scenario for the Cassini spacecraft. The Saturn-escape energy can be large enough to reach anywhere from the asteroid belt to the Kuiper belt, including the orbital radii of all gas giants, from Jupiter (at 5 AU) to Neptune (at 30 AU). In one example, we present a transfer to Jupiter in which the Cassini spacecraft escapes Saturn in 2012 to impact Jupiter nine years later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAstrodynamics 2007 - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, Proceedings of the AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference
Pages117-143
Number of pages27
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Event2007 AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference - Mackinac Island, MI, United States
Duration: Aug 19 2007Aug 23 2007

Publication series

NameAdvances in the Astronautical Sciences
Volume129 PART 1
ISSN (Print)0065-3438

Other

Other2007 AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference
CountryUnited States
CityMackinac Island, MI
Period8/19/078/23/07

Fingerprint

Saturn
Planets
Jupiter (planet)
Jupiter
escape
Spacecraft
planets
planet
trajectory
Trajectories
trajectories
Asteroids
spacecraft
Kuiper belt
asteroid belts
Gravitation
Neptune (planet)
Contamination
Neptune
Titan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Okutsu, M., Yam, C. H., Longuski, J. M., & Strange, N. J. (2008). Cassini end-of-life escape trajectories to the outer planets. In Astrodynamics 2007 - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, Proceedings of the AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference (pp. 117-143). (Advances in the Astronautical Sciences; Vol. 129 PART 1).
Okutsu, Masataka ; Yam, Chit Hong ; Longuski, James M. ; Strange, Nathan J. / Cassini end-of-life escape trajectories to the outer planets. Astrodynamics 2007 - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, Proceedings of the AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference. 2008. pp. 117-143 (Advances in the Astronautical Sciences).
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Okutsu, M, Yam, CH, Longuski, JM & Strange, NJ 2008, Cassini end-of-life escape trajectories to the outer planets. in Astrodynamics 2007 - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, Proceedings of the AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference. Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, vol. 129 PART 1, pp. 117-143, 2007 AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference, Mackinac Island, MI, United States, 8/19/07.

Cassini end-of-life escape trajectories to the outer planets. / Okutsu, Masataka; Yam, Chit Hong; Longuski, James M.; Strange, Nathan J.

Astrodynamics 2007 - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, Proceedings of the AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference. 2008. p. 117-143 (Advances in the Astronautical Sciences; Vol. 129 PART 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Okutsu M, Yam CH, Longuski JM, Strange NJ. Cassini end-of-life escape trajectories to the outer planets. In Astrodynamics 2007 - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, Proceedings of the AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference. 2008. p. 117-143. (Advances in the Astronautical Sciences).