Catalytic hydroxylation of benzene and cyclohexane using in situ generated hydrogen peroxide

Ayusman Sen, Joseph E. Remias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

H2O2 is considered an ideal "green" oxidant due to its high oxidizing ability and lack of toxic byproducts. An oxidation procedure that couples metallic palladium-catalyzed in situ H2O2 generation from dihydrogen and dioxygen with a second vanadium or iron catalyst that utilizes the hydrogen peroxide for the hydroxylation of benzene and cyclohexane was presented. The slow step in the overall reaction was the formation of usable H2O2, and the mechanism of hydroxylation by the second catalyst was not affected by the presence of metallic palladium. The reported procedure, which resembled monoxygenases, allowed the direct use of dioxygen in catalytic oxidations. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 227th ACS National Meeting (Anaheim, CA 3/28/2004-4/1/2004).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
Volume227
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2004

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Hydroxylation
Palladium
Cyclohexane
Benzene
Hydrogen peroxide
Hydrogen Peroxide
Oxygen
Vanadium
Catalysts
Catalytic oxidation
Poisons
Oxidants
Byproducts
Iron
Oxidation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

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Catalytic hydroxylation of benzene and cyclohexane using in situ generated hydrogen peroxide. / Sen, Ayusman; Remias, Joseph E.

In: ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts, Vol. 227, No. 1, 2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Catalytic hydroxylation of benzene and cyclohexane using in situ generated hydrogen peroxide

AU - Sen, Ayusman

AU - Remias, Joseph E.

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