Catalytic Motors-Quo Vadimus?

Krishna Kanti Dey, Flory Wong, Alicia Altemose, Ayusman Sen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-propelled, active colloidal systems are of great current interest from both fundamental as well as practical standpoints, with potential applications in nanomachinery, nanoscale assembly, robotics, fluidics, and chemical/biochemical sensing. This perspective focuses on chemically powered catalytic nano- and micromotors. We review the major advances to date in motor design, propulsion mechanisms and directional control, and inter-motor communication leading to collective behavior. We conclude by discussing the next steps in going forward: the fundamental questions that remain to be addressed and new design principles required for useful applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-13
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

micromotors
Micromotors
Robotic assembly
directional control
fluidics
Fluidics
propulsion
robotics
Propulsion
assembly
communication
Communication

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Dey, Krishna Kanti ; Wong, Flory ; Altemose, Alicia ; Sen, Ayusman. / Catalytic Motors-Quo Vadimus?. In: Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science. 2016 ; Vol. 21. pp. 4-13.
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Catalytic Motors-Quo Vadimus? / Dey, Krishna Kanti; Wong, Flory; Altemose, Alicia; Sen, Ayusman.

In: Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science, Vol. 21, 01.02.2016, p. 4-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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