Catatonia: A window into the cerebral underpinnings of will

Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza, Jorge Moll, Fátima Azevedo Ignácio, Paul Eslinger

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The will is one of the three pillars of the trilogy of mind that has pervaded Western thought for millennia, the other two being affectivity and cognition (Hilgard 1980). In the past century, the concept of will was imperceptibly replaced by the cognitive-oriented behavioral qualifiers "voluntary," "goal-directed," "purposive," and "executive" (Tranel et al. 1994), and has lost much of its heuristic merits, which are related to the notion of "human autonomy" (Lhermitte 1986). We view catatonia as the clinical expression of impairment of the brain mechanisms that promote human will. Catatonia is to the brain systems engaged in will, as coma is to the reticular ascending systems that promote sleep and wakefulness (Plum 1991).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)582-584
Number of pages3
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

Fingerprint

Catatonia
Wakefulness
Brain
Coma
Cognition
Sleep
Prunus domestica
Heuristics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo ; Moll, Jorge ; Ignácio, Fátima Azevedo ; Eslinger, Paul. / Catatonia : A window into the cerebral underpinnings of will. In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 2002 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 582-584.
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Catatonia : A window into the cerebral underpinnings of will. / de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Ignácio, Fátima Azevedo; Eslinger, Paul.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 5, 01.10.2002, p. 582-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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