Cell-Mediated Immunity (CMI) and bactericidal function in apparently healthy, well-nourished elderly vs younger women

N. Ahluwalia, D. Krause, M. Miles, S. Leach, A. Mastro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As part of an ongoing study on iron status and immune function, to collect baseline data and determine effects of aging on immunocompetence we examined CMI and bactericidal function in a cohort of older (O, n=12, age: 65-85y) versus younger (Y, n=21, age: 20-40y) women. Subjects were apparently healthy, free from inflammation, and generally well-nourished based on clinical chemistry and hematological tests. Our preliminary results suggest that although % lymphocytes in both age groups was normal, it was 23% higher in O vs Y (p<0.05). Specifically, total T- (CDS+) and T-helper (CD4+) subsets were higher (27 and 30% respectively) in O vs Y (p<0.05). The proliferation response of T cells to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was 55% lower in O vs Y (p<0.05), while no difference was seen with Concanavalin A. Natural killer (NK) cell activity expressed as % specific target cell lysis per NK cell was 41% lower in older women (p<0.05). The oxidative burst capacity of granulocytes and monocytes was unaffected with age (p>0.05). Based on our preliminary examination, we conclude that immunosenescence was limited to certain cell function markers (T-cell proliferation response to PHA, and NK cell activity) while other immune parameters were not compromised with age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 20 1998

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Clinical Chemistry Tests
Immunocompetence
Hematologic Tests
Cellular Immunity
Natural Killer Cells
cell-mediated immunity
Iron
Age Groups
Cell Proliferation
Lymphocytes
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes
T-cells
Cell proliferation
hematologic tests
immunocompetence
natural killer cells
Aging of materials
cell proliferation
chemistry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Ahluwalia, N. ; Krause, D. ; Miles, M. ; Leach, S. ; Mastro, A. / Cell-Mediated Immunity (CMI) and bactericidal function in apparently healthy, well-nourished elderly vs younger women. In: FASEB Journal. 1998 ; Vol. 12, No. 5.
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Cell-Mediated Immunity (CMI) and bactericidal function in apparently healthy, well-nourished elderly vs younger women. / Ahluwalia, N.; Krause, D.; Miles, M.; Leach, S.; Mastro, A.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 12, No. 5, 20.03.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Cell-Mediated Immunity (CMI) and bactericidal function in apparently healthy, well-nourished elderly vs younger women

AU - Ahluwalia, N.

AU - Krause, D.

AU - Miles, M.

AU - Leach, S.

AU - Mastro, A.

PY - 1998/3/20

Y1 - 1998/3/20

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