Cellular Organization of Neuroimmune Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

Kara Gross Margolis, Michael David Gershon, Milena Bogunovic

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the largest immune organ; in vertebrates, it is the only organ whose function is controlled by its own intrinsic enteric nervous system (ENS), but it is additionally regulated by extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. The GI nervous and immune systems are highly integrated in their common goal, which is to unite digestive functions with protection from ingested environmental threats. This review discusses the physiological relevance of enteric neuroimmune integration by summarizing the current knowledge of evolutionary and developmental pathways, cellular organization, and molecular mechanisms of neuroimmune interactions in health and disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-501
Number of pages15
JournalTrends in Immunology
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Neuroimmunomodulation
Enteric Nervous System
Conservation of Natural Resources
Nervous System
Vertebrates
Gastrointestinal Tract
Immune System
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Margolis, Kara Gross ; Gershon, Michael David ; Bogunovic, Milena. / Cellular Organization of Neuroimmune Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract. In: Trends in Immunology. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 7. pp. 487-501.
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Cellular Organization of Neuroimmune Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract. / Margolis, Kara Gross; Gershon, Michael David; Bogunovic, Milena.

In: Trends in Immunology, Vol. 37, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 487-501.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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