Cellulose nanocomposites production through coculturing

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been widely used due to its unique properties including remarkable porosity, water absorbency, moldability, and biological affinity. To further exploit the applications of BC, BC- based nanocomposites have been intensively researched through strategies such as biosynthetic modification, chemical modification, and in situ or ex situ patterns of functionalization of BC. Co-culturing Gluconacetobacter with other strains that produce unique polysaccharides or proteins is a new method to obtain BC-based nanocomposites without increasing the production cost. Only a few strains including Lactobacillus Mali and Escherichia coli have been reported to co-culture with Gluconacetobacter xylinus. However, how these bacteria affect the physical properties of BC remains unknown. This study chose Gluconacetobacter hansenii (G. hansenii) ATCC 23769, which does not produce any significant amount of water-soluble exopolysaccharides (EPS), and E. coli ATCC 700728, which could produce a polysaccharide called colanic acid, to conduct the co- culturing experiments. The X-ray diffraction result of BC produced through co-culturing reveals that an additional peak around 19.0° is identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
PublisherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Pages3003-3007
Number of pages5
Volume4
ISBN (Electronic)9781510810501
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015 - New Orleans, United States
Duration: Jul 26 2015Jul 29 2015

Other

OtherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period7/26/157/29/15

Fingerprint

nanocomposites
Cellulose
Nanocomposites
cellulose
Polysaccharides
Escherichia coli
Lactobacillus mali
Gluconacetobacter hansenii
Gluconacetobacter
polysaccharides
Gluconacetobacter xylinus
Water
exopolysaccharides
Chemical modification
coculture
production costs
X-ray diffraction
porosity
physical properties
Bacteria

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Liu, K., & Catchmark, J. M. (2015). Cellulose nanocomposites production through coculturing. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015 (Vol. 4, pp. 3003-3007). American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.
Liu, Ke ; Catchmark, Jeffrey M. / Cellulose nanocomposites production through coculturing. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. Vol. 4 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. pp. 3003-3007
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Liu, K & Catchmark, JM 2015, Cellulose nanocomposites production through coculturing. in American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. vol. 4, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, pp. 3003-3007, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015, New Orleans, United States, 7/26/15.

Cellulose nanocomposites production through coculturing. / Liu, Ke; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. Vol. 4 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. p. 3003-3007.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Liu K, Catchmark JM. Cellulose nanocomposites production through coculturing. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. Vol. 4. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 2015. p. 3003-3007