Challenges for the development of ribonucleoside analogues as inducers of error catastrophe

Jason D. Graci, Craig Eugene Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

RNA viruses are responsible for numerous human diseases; some of these viruses are also potential agents of bioterrorism. In general, the replication of RNA viruses results in the incorporation of at least one mutation per round of replication, leading to a heterogeneous population, termed a quasispecies. The antiviral nucleoside ribavirin has been shown to cause an increase in the mutation frequency of RNA viruses. This increase in mutation frequency leads to a loss of viability due to error catastrophe. In this article, we review lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy, emphasizing the challenges remaining for the development of lethal mutagenesis into a practical clinical approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalAntiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Ribonucleosides
RNA Viruses
Mutation Rate
Mutagenesis
Antiviral Agents
Biological Warfare Agents
Ribavirin
Nucleosides
Viruses
Mutation
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Virology

Cite this

@article{984ecc7013804ee09549a63a8df14d85,
title = "Challenges for the development of ribonucleoside analogues as inducers of error catastrophe",
abstract = "RNA viruses are responsible for numerous human diseases; some of these viruses are also potential agents of bioterrorism. In general, the replication of RNA viruses results in the incorporation of at least one mutation per round of replication, leading to a heterogeneous population, termed a quasispecies. The antiviral nucleoside ribavirin has been shown to cause an increase in the mutation frequency of RNA viruses. This increase in mutation frequency leads to a loss of viability due to error catastrophe. In this article, we review lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy, emphasizing the challenges remaining for the development of lethal mutagenesis into a practical clinical approach.",
author = "Graci, {Jason D.} and Cameron, {Craig Eugene}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/095632020401500101",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy",
issn = "0956-3202",
publisher = "International Medical Press Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Challenges for the development of ribonucleoside analogues as inducers of error catastrophe. / Graci, Jason D.; Cameron, Craig Eugene.

In: Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Challenges for the development of ribonucleoside analogues as inducers of error catastrophe

AU - Graci, Jason D.

AU - Cameron, Craig Eugene

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - RNA viruses are responsible for numerous human diseases; some of these viruses are also potential agents of bioterrorism. In general, the replication of RNA viruses results in the incorporation of at least one mutation per round of replication, leading to a heterogeneous population, termed a quasispecies. The antiviral nucleoside ribavirin has been shown to cause an increase in the mutation frequency of RNA viruses. This increase in mutation frequency leads to a loss of viability due to error catastrophe. In this article, we review lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy, emphasizing the challenges remaining for the development of lethal mutagenesis into a practical clinical approach.

AB - RNA viruses are responsible for numerous human diseases; some of these viruses are also potential agents of bioterrorism. In general, the replication of RNA viruses results in the incorporation of at least one mutation per round of replication, leading to a heterogeneous population, termed a quasispecies. The antiviral nucleoside ribavirin has been shown to cause an increase in the mutation frequency of RNA viruses. This increase in mutation frequency leads to a loss of viability due to error catastrophe. In this article, we review lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy, emphasizing the challenges remaining for the development of lethal mutagenesis into a practical clinical approach.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2542455737&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2542455737&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/095632020401500101

DO - 10.1177/095632020401500101

M3 - Review article

VL - 15

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy

JF - Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy

SN - 0956-3202

IS - 1

ER -