Change in nutrient intakes, number of servings, and contributions of total fat from food groups in 4- To 10-year-old children enrolled in a nutrition education study

Jeannie Mckenzie, Lori Beth Dixon, Helen Smiciklas-Wright, Diane Mitchell, Barbara Shannon, Andrew Tershakovec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To determine change in nutrient intakes, number of servings, and contributions of total fat from food groups in children who lowered their dietary fat intake. Design A research and demonstration study designed to lower plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. There were four study groups: two intervention and two control groups. All children had hypercholesterolemia except for those in one control group. Three 24-hour dietary recalls were collected on randomly assigned days over a 2-week period at baseline and 3 months after the intervention. Subjects Three hundred three 4- to 10-year old children from suburbs north of Philadelphia, Pa. Interventions One intervention involved a home-based, parent-child autotutorial program (PCAT group) with audiotaped stories and print materials for the children and their families; the other intervention involved one face-to-face counseling session with a registered dietitian (counseling group). Outcome measures Change in mean nutrient intakes compared with the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA); change in number of servings and mean grams of total fat contributed from 10 different food groups. Statistical analyses performed Analyses of variance and χ2 analyses. Results Children in every study group had mean intakes of all nutrients (except vitamin D) greater than 67% of the RDA 3 months after the baseline measurement. Several food groups (ie, meats, dairy products, fats/oils, and desserts) provided less total fat to the diets of children who reduced their dietary lipid intake after 3 months (ie, PCAT and counseling groups). These children also reduced the mean number of servings selected from these food groups. Within these same food groups, some children consumed fewer servings of higher fat foods and more servings of lower fat foods. Applications/conclusions Children who lowered their dietary fat intake after intervention reported both quantitative and qualitative changes in food choices from several food groups. These choices did not significantly reduce their nutrient intakes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)865-873
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume96
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Change in nutrient intakes, number of servings, and contributions of total fat from food groups in 4- To 10-year-old children enrolled in a nutrition education study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this