Changes in latitude, changes in attitude

Analysis of the effects of reverse culture shock - a study of students returning from youth expeditions

Peter Renton Allison, Jennifer Davis-Berman, Dene Berman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the long history of youth expeditions and a growing number of participants and claims of being concerned with 'youth development', expeditions have received little attention by leisure and/or educational researchers in the UK. Recent literature specifically examining expeditions in the UK demonstrates an increasing interest in this phenomenon that sits on the juncture of education and leisure. There has been some critique regarding lack of clarity of recreational or educational aims and ethical issues. Literature from travel and tourism, management learning and international education all indicate that culture shock and reverse culture shock (RCS) are experienced in a range of contexts. These two literatures are summarised and inform the present research. This research focused on gaining an initial understanding of young people's experiences of returning home after an expedition. Data were gathered six months after a six-week expedition (n = 19) to south-west Greenland to undertake science and journeys on the ice cap. Using a qualitative approach to analyse these data the following themes were identified as affecting the participants' expedition reverse culture shock (ERCS): Sense of Isolation, Extending the Lessons of the Group and Using the Group as a Compass for the Future. Connections are made to literature on RCS and some suggestions made for facilitating ERCS. Other implications are considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-503
Number of pages17
JournalLeisure Studies
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

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culture shock
student
education
tourism management
ice cap
social isolation
Group
learning
Tourism
travel
analysis
effect
youth
Culture shock
literature
lack
history
science
management
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

Cite this

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Changes in latitude, changes in attitude : Analysis of the effects of reverse culture shock - a study of students returning from youth expeditions. / Allison, Peter Renton; Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Berman, Dene.

In: Leisure Studies, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.10.2012, p. 487-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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