Changes in population dynamics in mutualistic versus pathogenic viruses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although generally regarded as pathogens, viruses can also be mutualists. A number of examples of extreme mutualism (i.e., symbiogenesis) have been well studied. Other examples of mutualism are less common, but this is likely because viruses have rarely been thought of as having any beneficial effects on their hosts. The effect of mutualism on the population dynamics of viruses is a topic that has not been addressed experimentally. However, the potential for understanding mutualism and how a virus might become a mutualist may be elucidated by understanding these dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-19
Number of pages8
JournalViruses
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Symbiosis
Population Dynamics
Viruses

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

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Changes in population dynamics in mutualistic versus pathogenic viruses. / Roossinck, Marilyn J.

In: Viruses, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 12-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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