Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects

John A. Eddy, Ronald Lynn Gilliland, Douglas V. Hoyt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spacecraft measurements have established that the total radiative output of the Sun varies at the 0.1-0.3% level. The observed fluctuations are well modelled as radiative deficits proportional to the area of the solar disk covered by sunspots. Historical records of projected sunspot areas allow an accurate reconstruction of these short-term fluctuations over the past century. Such changes can be expected to perturb the terrestrial surf ace temperature by a fraction of a degree centigrade and probable evidence of this solar-induced signal has been found. The effect, though important in terms of understanding the climate system, is too small to be significant in practical weather or climate predictions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-693
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume300
Issue number5894
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1982

Fingerprint

sunspot
climate prediction
historical record
spacecraft
weather
climate
temperature
climatic effect
effect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Eddy, J. A., Gilliland, R. L., & Hoyt, D. V. (1982). Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects. Nature, 300(5894), 689-693. https://doi.org/10.1038/300689a0
Eddy, John A. ; Gilliland, Ronald Lynn ; Hoyt, Douglas V. / Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects. In: Nature. 1982 ; Vol. 300, No. 5894. pp. 689-693.
@article{0e5456ec11a742048a59a17d0d216533,
title = "Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects",
abstract = "Spacecraft measurements have established that the total radiative output of the Sun varies at the 0.1-0.3{\%} level. The observed fluctuations are well modelled as radiative deficits proportional to the area of the solar disk covered by sunspots. Historical records of projected sunspot areas allow an accurate reconstruction of these short-term fluctuations over the past century. Such changes can be expected to perturb the terrestrial surf ace temperature by a fraction of a degree centigrade and probable evidence of this solar-induced signal has been found. The effect, though important in terms of understanding the climate system, is too small to be significant in practical weather or climate predictions.",
author = "Eddy, {John A.} and Gilliland, {Ronald Lynn} and Hoyt, {Douglas V.}",
year = "1982",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/300689a0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "300",
pages = "689--693",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "5894",

}

Eddy, JA, Gilliland, RL & Hoyt, DV 1982, 'Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects', Nature, vol. 300, no. 5894, pp. 689-693. https://doi.org/10.1038/300689a0

Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects. / Eddy, John A.; Gilliland, Ronald Lynn; Hoyt, Douglas V.

In: Nature, Vol. 300, No. 5894, 01.12.1982, p. 689-693.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects

AU - Eddy, John A.

AU - Gilliland, Ronald Lynn

AU - Hoyt, Douglas V.

PY - 1982/12/1

Y1 - 1982/12/1

N2 - Spacecraft measurements have established that the total radiative output of the Sun varies at the 0.1-0.3% level. The observed fluctuations are well modelled as radiative deficits proportional to the area of the solar disk covered by sunspots. Historical records of projected sunspot areas allow an accurate reconstruction of these short-term fluctuations over the past century. Such changes can be expected to perturb the terrestrial surf ace temperature by a fraction of a degree centigrade and probable evidence of this solar-induced signal has been found. The effect, though important in terms of understanding the climate system, is too small to be significant in practical weather or climate predictions.

AB - Spacecraft measurements have established that the total radiative output of the Sun varies at the 0.1-0.3% level. The observed fluctuations are well modelled as radiative deficits proportional to the area of the solar disk covered by sunspots. Historical records of projected sunspot areas allow an accurate reconstruction of these short-term fluctuations over the past century. Such changes can be expected to perturb the terrestrial surf ace temperature by a fraction of a degree centigrade and probable evidence of this solar-induced signal has been found. The effect, though important in terms of understanding the climate system, is too small to be significant in practical weather or climate predictions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020450835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020450835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/300689a0

DO - 10.1038/300689a0

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:0020450835

VL - 300

SP - 689

EP - 693

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 5894

ER -

Eddy JA, Gilliland RL, Hoyt DV. Changes in the solar constant and climatic effects. Nature. 1982 Dec 1;300(5894):689-693. https://doi.org/10.1038/300689a0