Changing salary structure and faculty composition within business schools

Differences across sectors and state funding levels

John Jesse Cheslock, Trina M. Callie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We employ new data to examine how public higher education institutions adjusted the salaries and composition of their business faculty during a financially challenging period. The data's multilevel structure allows us to describe changes in between-institution inequality, within-institution inequality, and their interaction. To examine the role of finances, we compare public and private institutions and employ difference and fixed-effects models to study the effect of state appropriations. Our results indicate that financially stressed publics almost matched the salary increases of their competitors between 1999 and 2006, but reductions in the number of professors. especially full professors. accompanied this salary growth. The salary gap across public institutions increased, while within institutions, salary compression and salary inequality within rank grew.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-54
Number of pages13
JournalEconomics of Education Review
Volume49
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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business school
salary
funding
public institution
university teacher
private institution
Funding
Salary
Business schools
finance
interaction
education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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AB - We employ new data to examine how public higher education institutions adjusted the salaries and composition of their business faculty during a financially challenging period. The data's multilevel structure allows us to describe changes in between-institution inequality, within-institution inequality, and their interaction. To examine the role of finances, we compare public and private institutions and employ difference and fixed-effects models to study the effect of state appropriations. Our results indicate that financially stressed publics almost matched the salary increases of their competitors between 1999 and 2006, but reductions in the number of professors. especially full professors. accompanied this salary growth. The salary gap across public institutions increased, while within institutions, salary compression and salary inequality within rank grew.

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