Characteristics of a 3D-printed prosthetic hand for use in developing countries

Corinne Dally, Daniel Johnson, Moriah Canon, Sarah C. Ritter, Khanjan Mehta

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Arising out of civil conflict, disease, birth defects, and traumatic accidents, many people in developing countries lack hands or fingers. Prosthetic hands can help give these people a sense of agency and increased ability to perform everyday tasks. Unfortunately, many prostheses are prohibitively expensive and often require frequent maintenance and repair. Therefore, they are financially and geographically inaccessible to most people living in developing countries. A 3D printed, open-source hand is one possible solution owing to its low cost and potential for customization. However, the hand must be appropriate for the environmental conditions and lifestyles found in developing countries. To characterize the functionality of the 3D printed hand, a series of daily task and object tests were carried out. While the prosthesis was able to successfully complete a number of tasks, it had difficulty with those that required intricate movements and with heavy objects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages66-70
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781467365611
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2015
Event5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Oct 8 2015Oct 11 2015

Other

Other5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period10/8/1510/11/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Development
  • Education

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