Characteristics of participants visiting the Canada on the move website

Ronald C. Plotnikoff, John C. Spence, Leonor S. Tavares, Liza Rovniak, Adrian Bauman, Scott A. Lear, Linda McCargar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Internet is a potential medium to attain large groups of Canadians for physical activity monitoring and interventions, however, little is known about the characteristics of participants who could be recruited on a national level. Our objectives were to determine: 1) the extent to which our sample was representative of the Canadian population; 2) the demographic, social-cognitive and physical activity behaviour, and environmental characteristics of one-time and multi-time users of the Canada on the Move website; and 3) whether certain recruitment strategies were more likely to reach specific demographic subgroups. Methods: Web-based self-report measures were collected on demographic, social-cognitive, physical activity behaviour, and environmental factors. Descriptive statistics were employed to address the study's research objectives. Results: Significant differences (p<0.001) were found between our total sample and 2001 Canadian census/Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) data on all demographic and physical activity behaviour measures. One-time and multi-time users significantly differed on age (p<0.005) and being responsible for children under age 13 (p=0.01). No differences existed between the groups on any of the social-cognitive, behavioural or environmental variables. Source of knowledge about the Canada on the Move website between one-time and multi-time users was not significantly different. Conclusion: The Canada on the Move website presents aviable approach to reaching diverse demographic groups. Further work needs to be undertaken to: 1) develop engaging websites; 2) detail the monitoring of the web-based access information; 3) integrate the Website with other organizations promoting physical activity; and 4) expand the number of recruitment sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCanadian Journal of Public Health
Volume97
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Fingerprint

Canada
Demography
Exercise
Censuses
Health Surveys
Internet
Self Report
Organizations
Research
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Plotnikoff, R. C., Spence, J. C., Tavares, L. S., Rovniak, L., Bauman, A., Lear, S. A., & McCargar, L. (2006). Characteristics of participants visiting the Canada on the move website. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 97(SUPPL. 1).
Plotnikoff, Ronald C. ; Spence, John C. ; Tavares, Leonor S. ; Rovniak, Liza ; Bauman, Adrian ; Lear, Scott A. ; McCargar, Linda. / Characteristics of participants visiting the Canada on the move website. In: Canadian Journal of Public Health. 2006 ; Vol. 97, No. SUPPL. 1.
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abstract = "Background: The Internet is a potential medium to attain large groups of Canadians for physical activity monitoring and interventions, however, little is known about the characteristics of participants who could be recruited on a national level. Our objectives were to determine: 1) the extent to which our sample was representative of the Canadian population; 2) the demographic, social-cognitive and physical activity behaviour, and environmental characteristics of one-time and multi-time users of the Canada on the Move website; and 3) whether certain recruitment strategies were more likely to reach specific demographic subgroups. Methods: Web-based self-report measures were collected on demographic, social-cognitive, physical activity behaviour, and environmental factors. Descriptive statistics were employed to address the study's research objectives. Results: Significant differences (p<0.001) were found between our total sample and 2001 Canadian census/Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) data on all demographic and physical activity behaviour measures. One-time and multi-time users significantly differed on age (p<0.005) and being responsible for children under age 13 (p=0.01). No differences existed between the groups on any of the social-cognitive, behavioural or environmental variables. Source of knowledge about the Canada on the Move website between one-time and multi-time users was not significantly different. Conclusion: The Canada on the Move website presents aviable approach to reaching diverse demographic groups. Further work needs to be undertaken to: 1) develop engaging websites; 2) detail the monitoring of the web-based access information; 3) integrate the Website with other organizations promoting physical activity; and 4) expand the number of recruitment sources.",
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Plotnikoff, RC, Spence, JC, Tavares, LS, Rovniak, L, Bauman, A, Lear, SA & McCargar, L 2006, 'Characteristics of participants visiting the Canada on the move website', Canadian Journal of Public Health, vol. 97, no. SUPPL. 1.

Characteristics of participants visiting the Canada on the move website. / Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Spence, John C.; Tavares, Leonor S.; Rovniak, Liza; Bauman, Adrian; Lear, Scott A.; McCargar, Linda.

In: Canadian Journal of Public Health, Vol. 97, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.03.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lear, Scott A.

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Plotnikoff RC, Spence JC, Tavares LS, Rovniak L, Bauman A, Lear SA et al. Characteristics of participants visiting the Canada on the move website. Canadian Journal of Public Health. 2006 Mar 1;97(SUPPL. 1).