Characteristics of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty for laryngomalacia

Frank G. Garritano, Michele Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the characteristics of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty for the treatment of laryngomalacia and to better understand the features of laryngomalacia that may predispose patients to the need for supraglottoplasty. Methods: Review of patients who underwent supraglottoplasty for laryngomalacia at our academic tertiary care children's hospital between 2005 and 2012 examining demographic information, medical comorbidities, symptoms, indications for surgery, operative findings and procedure, site of laryngeal obstruction, operative techniques, and surgical success rates. Results: Seventeen patients with laryngomalacia underwent nineteen procedures. The most common indications for supraglottoplasty were persistent stridor beyond 18 months of age (64.7%), difficulty feeding (47%), and failure to thrive (29.4%). The most common comorbidities were gastroesophageal reflux (88.2%) and cardiopulmonary disease (35.3%). Operative findings included shortened aryepiglottic folds in sixteen patients (94.1%), retropositioned epiglottis in sixteen (94.1%), and prolapsed arytenoid mucosa in five (29.4%). Fifteen patients (88.2%) underwent division of the aryepiglottic folds and four underwent ablation of arytenoid mucosa (23.5%). Of the seventeen patients who had followed up at the time of study conclusion, sixteen (94.1%) had symptom improvement and twelve (70.6%) had complete resolution of their symptoms. Conclusions: Supraglottoplasty is an effective treatment for laryngomalacia. Outcomes in our patients are similar to those reported in prior literature. The findings of shortened aryepiglottic folds and a retropositioned epiglottis appear to be disproportionately represented in our cohort of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1095-1100
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume78
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Laryngomalacia
Epiglottis
Comorbidity
Mucous Membrane
Failure to Thrive
Time and Motion Studies
Operative Surgical Procedures
Respiratory Sounds
Tertiary Healthcare
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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title = "Characteristics of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty for laryngomalacia",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the characteristics of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty for the treatment of laryngomalacia and to better understand the features of laryngomalacia that may predispose patients to the need for supraglottoplasty. Methods: Review of patients who underwent supraglottoplasty for laryngomalacia at our academic tertiary care children's hospital between 2005 and 2012 examining demographic information, medical comorbidities, symptoms, indications for surgery, operative findings and procedure, site of laryngeal obstruction, operative techniques, and surgical success rates. Results: Seventeen patients with laryngomalacia underwent nineteen procedures. The most common indications for supraglottoplasty were persistent stridor beyond 18 months of age (64.7{\%}), difficulty feeding (47{\%}), and failure to thrive (29.4{\%}). The most common comorbidities were gastroesophageal reflux (88.2{\%}) and cardiopulmonary disease (35.3{\%}). Operative findings included shortened aryepiglottic folds in sixteen patients (94.1{\%}), retropositioned epiglottis in sixteen (94.1{\%}), and prolapsed arytenoid mucosa in five (29.4{\%}). Fifteen patients (88.2{\%}) underwent division of the aryepiglottic folds and four underwent ablation of arytenoid mucosa (23.5{\%}). Of the seventeen patients who had followed up at the time of study conclusion, sixteen (94.1{\%}) had symptom improvement and twelve (70.6{\%}) had complete resolution of their symptoms. Conclusions: Supraglottoplasty is an effective treatment for laryngomalacia. Outcomes in our patients are similar to those reported in prior literature. The findings of shortened aryepiglottic folds and a retropositioned epiglottis appear to be disproportionately represented in our cohort of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty.",
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Characteristics of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty for laryngomalacia. / Garritano, Frank G.; Carr, Michele.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 78, No. 7, 01.01.2014, p. 1095-1100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Objective: To examine the characteristics of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty for the treatment of laryngomalacia and to better understand the features of laryngomalacia that may predispose patients to the need for supraglottoplasty. Methods: Review of patients who underwent supraglottoplasty for laryngomalacia at our academic tertiary care children's hospital between 2005 and 2012 examining demographic information, medical comorbidities, symptoms, indications for surgery, operative findings and procedure, site of laryngeal obstruction, operative techniques, and surgical success rates. Results: Seventeen patients with laryngomalacia underwent nineteen procedures. The most common indications for supraglottoplasty were persistent stridor beyond 18 months of age (64.7%), difficulty feeding (47%), and failure to thrive (29.4%). The most common comorbidities were gastroesophageal reflux (88.2%) and cardiopulmonary disease (35.3%). Operative findings included shortened aryepiglottic folds in sixteen patients (94.1%), retropositioned epiglottis in sixteen (94.1%), and prolapsed arytenoid mucosa in five (29.4%). Fifteen patients (88.2%) underwent division of the aryepiglottic folds and four underwent ablation of arytenoid mucosa (23.5%). Of the seventeen patients who had followed up at the time of study conclusion, sixteen (94.1%) had symptom improvement and twelve (70.6%) had complete resolution of their symptoms. Conclusions: Supraglottoplasty is an effective treatment for laryngomalacia. Outcomes in our patients are similar to those reported in prior literature. The findings of shortened aryepiglottic folds and a retropositioned epiglottis appear to be disproportionately represented in our cohort of patients undergoing supraglottoplasty.

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