Characterization of oxide layers formed during corrosion in supercritical water

Arthur Thompson Motta, J. Bischoff, A. Siwy, M. J. Gomes Da Silva, R. J. Comstock, Z. Cai, B. Lai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Supercritical Water Reactor is one of the Generation IV nuclear power plant designs envisioned for its high thermal efficiency. Uniform corrosion is one of the main challenges to finding suitable materials for structural components and fuel cladding. The corrosion rate depends on the nature of the protective oxide formed, such that small alloying content differences cause significant differences in corrosion rate. By studying in detail the oxide layer with a combination of microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to discern which characteristic oxide structures lead to protective behavior and a lower corrosion rate. A review is presented of studies conducted in protective oxide layers formed during corrosion ofzirconium alloys and in ferritic-martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened steels in supercritical water at 500-600 C for different exposure times. Microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence allows us to probe the structure of the oxide layers with unprecedented sensitivity and submicron spatial resolution. For the zirconium alloys a characteristic structure formed at the oxide-metal interface is associated with protective behavior. In the case of advanced steels, a sequence of sub layers of oxide layers is observed where particular phases are shown to be crucial to protective behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication17th International Corrosion Congress 2008
Subtitle of host publicationCorrosion Control in the Service of Society
Pages3146-3157
Number of pages12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Event17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society - Las Vegas, NV, United States
Duration: Oct 6 2008Oct 10 2008

Publication series

Name17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society
Volume5

Other

Other17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society
CountryUnited States
CityLas Vegas, NV
Period10/6/0810/10/08

Fingerprint

Oxides
Corrosion
Water
Corrosion rate
Steel
Synchrotron radiation
Diffraction
Fluorescence
Zirconium alloys
Alloying
Nuclear power plants
Metals
Transmission electron microscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Motta, A. T., Bischoff, J., Siwy, A., Gomes Da Silva, M. J., Comstock, R. J., Cai, Z., & Lai, B. (2008). Characterization of oxide layers formed during corrosion in supercritical water. In 17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society (pp. 3146-3157). (17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society; Vol. 5).
Motta, Arthur Thompson ; Bischoff, J. ; Siwy, A. ; Gomes Da Silva, M. J. ; Comstock, R. J. ; Cai, Z. ; Lai, B. / Characterization of oxide layers formed during corrosion in supercritical water. 17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society. 2008. pp. 3146-3157 (17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society).
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Motta, AT, Bischoff, J, Siwy, A, Gomes Da Silva, MJ, Comstock, RJ, Cai, Z & Lai, B 2008, Characterization of oxide layers formed during corrosion in supercritical water. in 17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society. 17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society, vol. 5, pp. 3146-3157, 17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society, Las Vegas, NV, United States, 10/6/08.

Characterization of oxide layers formed during corrosion in supercritical water. / Motta, Arthur Thompson; Bischoff, J.; Siwy, A.; Gomes Da Silva, M. J.; Comstock, R. J.; Cai, Z.; Lai, B.

17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society. 2008. p. 3146-3157 (17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Motta AT, Bischoff J, Siwy A, Gomes Da Silva MJ, Comstock RJ, Cai Z et al. Characterization of oxide layers formed during corrosion in supercritical water. In 17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society. 2008. p. 3146-3157. (17th International Corrosion Congress 2008: Corrosion Control in the Service of Society).