Abstract

Approximately 100 farmers' markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010 and October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US (Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center) were conducted. Markets reported serving 180-2,000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n = 585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics - most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers' markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers' markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-731
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Preventive Medicine
farmer
customer
Health
market
Community-Institutional Relations
Health Behavior
community
Education
health
employee
medicine
Population
Farmers
health behavior
education
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{1b9973104f56491aa12bc9cfd0947790,
title = "Characterizing customers at medical center farmers' markets",
abstract = "Approximately 100 farmers' markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010 and October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US (Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center) were conducted. Markets reported serving 180-2,000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n = 585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics - most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers' markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers' markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health.",
author = "Jennifer Kraschnewski and Daniel George and Liza Rovniak and Monroe, {Diana L.} and Elizabeth Fiordalis and Erica Bates",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10900-014-9818-x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "727--731",
journal = "Journal of Community Health",
issn = "0094-5145",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "4",

}

Characterizing customers at medical center farmers' markets. / Kraschnewski, Jennifer; George, Daniel; Rovniak, Liza; Monroe, Diana L.; Fiordalis, Elizabeth; Bates, Erica.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 39, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 727-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterizing customers at medical center farmers' markets

AU - Kraschnewski, Jennifer

AU - George, Daniel

AU - Rovniak, Liza

AU - Monroe, Diana L.

AU - Fiordalis, Elizabeth

AU - Bates, Erica

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Approximately 100 farmers' markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010 and October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US (Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center) were conducted. Markets reported serving 180-2,000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n = 585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics - most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers' markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers' markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health.

AB - Approximately 100 farmers' markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010 and October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US (Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center) were conducted. Markets reported serving 180-2,000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n = 585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics - most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers' markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers' markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903766165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84903766165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10900-014-9818-x

DO - 10.1007/s10900-014-9818-x

M3 - Article

C2 - 24421001

AN - SCOPUS:84903766165

VL - 39

SP - 727

EP - 731

JO - Journal of Community Health

JF - Journal of Community Health

SN - 0094-5145

IS - 4

ER -